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Probably a well discussed topic, but a first for me. I need some advice. Up here in Canada, during our cold, dry and significant sub zero degree winters I have elected to bring my battery inside. I purchased the trailer new in July. Q1 Will storing it inside at room temp keep it safe for next year. Q2 Should I hook it up to a trickle charger for the winter? Q3 Anything else I should do?
This would be the time of year I wished I lived in Arizona.
 

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i'm a long way from cold Canada but i'd think you'd be in good shape as long as by "trickle" charger, you mean a "smart" charger that will not over charge the batteries.

about July (105 degrees and 100% humidity) down here and i'm ready to head up there....
 

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100% agree with bobrussell. Remove the batteries, store in a well-ventilated place, and keep them on a smart charger to prevent overcharging. There are plug in chargers than then plug onto the battery to keep it charged and conditioned.

However, if the deep cycle battery you use for the RV is NOT maintenance free, you will still need to check the water level of the battery cells and be prepared to refill them with "distilled" water even with the smart charger. Be careful not to get any battery liquid on anything.
 

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I live in Montana and have the same cold weather storage issues that you have in Canada.
I pull my batteries out and stick them in the basement. About once a month I'll put them on a 2amp trickle charge overnight to keep them topped off. When I charge them though I take them to the garage for safety reasons.
Never had a big battery blow up, but I am a radio control car/truck/boat geek and I have had some scary experiences with charging batteries.
Keep telling myself one of these days I'm gonna buy a battery tender......but never get around to it.
 

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We always give them a full charge and store them in a relatively warm place, such as the basement or heated/insulated garage. Keep them on a shelf or sitting on blocks or something, just so they are off the concrete floor
 

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Battery storage

A charged battery will not be affected by low temps.
I have found the best way to keep RV batteries is to allow the RV converter to do the charging. It is an easy method to keep the batteries charged by plugging the RV converter into a time clock that is set to charge the batteries twice each day for about an hour each charge. The batteries will be very ready. A lead acid battery is fully charged when the voltage is 12.6 when checked with a digital multimeter or digital volt meter. If a battery indicates 12.0 volts, the battery is 75% discharged. The number one reason for alternator failure.... bad battery connections...Frank in Idaho
 

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I'm not so sure I'd rely on the RV converter to keep my battery charged correctly. I have heard many stories that many of these converters will overcharge them unless you have a smart charger that prevents overcharging. Overcharging can damage your battery no matter what the temperature. You should make sure the smart charger also helps prevent sulfation and other types of battery harm. For non-maintenance free batteries you still must check the water.

I'm just thinking that since batteries do have water for the cells, then it might be prone to freezing in some way which I've read in a few forums and articles but I don't remember at what temperature.

I've never heard that statement before "A charged battery will not be affected by low temps" but I have heard multiple times the other concerns and maintenance I posted and that low temps could affect a battery. Thanks for the great statement but can you provide the source of that information? I'd like to put that in my memory banks as additional things to know. Thanks.
 
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