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Outdoor camping is a different experience, an experience that cannot be obtained in ordinary life. Whether it is an office worker, a student party, or an elderly retired person, or even an innocent child, I think they all have the expectation of an outdoor life of their own in their hearts. It is March, the willow branches are getting greener and greener, the wildflowers are blooming just right, the butterflies are dancing, and the birds are singing beautiful songs. Spring is not as hot as summer, not as cold as winter, nor as sad as autumn. Everything is a new beginning, everything has a new hope. Taking advantage of the rest, while the children are still young, the parents are alive, while the years are good, and while we are the backbone, should we take the family to experience the fun of outdoor camping?
But what do we need to pay attention to in outdoor camping, especially children and the elderly are vulnerable groups, and they should pay more attention to their physical safety. Let me briefly introduce a few common sense of outdoor life, I hope to provide a little reference for friends who are about to camp.
Weather Before deciding to camp, we must pay attention to the weather conditions of the campsite. If conditions permit, we can refer to the monitoring conditions of the local weather station or the 72-hour weather conditions of the weather forecast, which are more authoritative and reliable. We need to avoid extreme weather such as strong wind, heavy rain, cooling, sand and dust.
Convenient transportation The camping site should be easily accessible. Vehicles can be parked near the campsite. If an accident occurs, everyone can take timely measures to evacuate safely and quickly. Try not to go deep in the mountains, on the edge of cliffs. The scenery may appeal to you, but it also requires you to walk, which not only consumes physical strength, but also increases the uncertain risk factor.
Water source Water is the source of life, the human body is composed of water, lack of water will cause physical discomfort and affect the good interest of camping.
 

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Welcome! to the forum...


For me enjoyment of the great outdoors including its natural residents is paramount...
...personally I enjoy the variety of experience and the change from humdrum existence (can't really call it life, IMO)...

I might suggest folks to try and mindfully live in the moment ... But I would never preach that at them...

There is too much fear in the world (much/most of it;without reason...IMO).

At one camp near a Jeep trail, a vehicle pulled up and the occupants screamed "There is a BEAR on the other side of those trees"
...me; without much reaction; "Yup, They live here"....

Brown bears have run though the campsites multiple times; they are apparently afraid of being eaten... That does not mean that I do not have methods of dealing with them at hand; 'cause they live there; and just might be, individually, dangerous..

Even in the desert I don't worry about water issues (Because I am an intelligent experienced being and plan ahead with more than adequate supplies).

Crawlers and toddlers need attentive watching (by their parents). Adults; until they become infirm or mentally distracted should need none (its up to the caregiver to determine the limits of non-sentient people, IMO).

The wild is not particularly dangerous, BUT it is unforgiving of mistakes... this results in evolution; perhaps, less than optimum individually but good for the species as a whole. Don't become a victim of your own unthinking, ignorance. There is an award (recognition) for people who fail, most spectacularly;
https://darwinawards.com/

Personally, I go to relatively extreme lengths to camp in inaccessible areas; I have found that once a good campsite is readily accessible it is shortly ruined by the irresponsible, unthinking, morons.
"Keep it secret. Keep it safe"... Gandalf (speaking of something precious...

Weather happens; weather forecasts are just another tool to allow people to prepare... Though I do admit that waking up to find the tent mostly collapsed on you due to a heavy (unforecast) snow load in June is a bit disconcerting, the first time.
The quiet fresh woodland afterward is amazing and beautiful!. (If I had known I would have brought snow shoes; as it was I learned that a person can "swim" over snowdrifts when their feet no longer reach the ground).

Enjoy!
 
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I do confess to being a cloud watcher since being aware of the environment is one of the best ways to keep from getting soaked (uncomfortably) in an unexpected shower...
I typicality try to be aware of the general direction of cloud movement and watch for the dark grey storm clouds (and take rain gear if going on a short day hike if precipitation looks probable.
If the weather map, before the trip, shows that an extended period of inclement weather is likely, I tend to reschedule the trip (Yes; I am a fair weather camper).

Heavy thunder showers have occasionally resulted to relatively deep puddles. I now try to place the tent on a small rise or slightly sloped area to avoid water coming up through the floor; or up on the sides of the tent and having the tent try to float....

Having had several inverters destroyed by near miss (hit??) lightning strikes; I watch for pealed bark, & boiled up fluffy ground at the bases of trees along with scorch marks on tree sides near where I expect to pitch the tend as these are/may be evidence of past lighting strikes, and lightning often strikes the same place, or nearby, more than once (contrary to the old tale).

Heavy hail and other camping disasters some times happen and, really, other than throwing a heavy tarp over the tent and vehicle; huddling in a vehicle, watching the dents happen and the glass break... there is little defense... fortunately this is very, very rare...

Enjoy!
 
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