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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took out my old anode and of course threw it in the garbage without thinking. I went and bought a new one and it seems to have a different thread pattern. I assumed they were all the same. Anyone have any information on this?
 

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You have to buy the rod that fits your heater. The make that is. Suburban, Atwood.
 

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I thought the fittings were the same, but I take my model number with me when I shop for a replacement and match it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I bought one and then got the company i bought my trailer from send one. They do not screw on at all. It really feels if i used the wrench to turn it on it will strip it completely. The company I bought it from said it is the correct one and is not suppose to go on easy. Can anyone confirm or deny this?
 

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Since there only seems to be one that fits most Atwoods that would have to be it. I hope the fitting is not messed up or you might have to have it re-machined.

Maybe some can make suggestions on getting this repaired. Maybe you tow your rig to an RV place and have them look at it. Something seems awry and without being there I can't make any more suggestions. Anyone else?
 

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The threads are tapered pipe threads. The plug doesn't go in far. Does it start and then tighten up? It will do that quickly,maybe a turn or two. Mine is a pain to get in. It is a on a strange angle and tough to get lined up. I use a long socket with a dowel in it and a small extension.
I hope you didn't screw up the threads by trying to install the wrong plug. If you know a plumber, he will have a chase to clean up the threads. You can also use a wire brush, like they use for cleaning copper pipe before soldering, to clean the hwh's threads. I use the brush on mine, just to get some rust and debris out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ok well that makes me feel better. It only goes in maybe 2 turns and gets VERY tight. I guess that is the way it is suppose to be, I assumed it went all the way in. Thanks all for the help.

Do I use teflon tape?
 

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If it goes in 2 full turns it's fine. It is a tapered thread. You can use the tape if you like, there is no need for it. Just remember to clean the threads off next spring or whenever you remove the plug. Then apply new when putting it back. Clean the threads in the heater as well.
Just a note. When I fill my tank I open the relief valve on top. It lets the air out, so the tank will fill all the way, then pop it closed. Then I open the hot faucets. Just my way, others just open the faucet. Check for a leak.
Happy camping.
 

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I didn't know the fitting was tapered. Just like dogbone describes it will ONLY go in so far because of it.

DO NOT use teflon on plastic or nylon fittings. You can use food grade plumbers putty if you are concerned about a seal, but teflon defeats the advantage of a plastic or nylon fitting and may even act as a lubricate which can cause the fitting to come loose.

Teflon is intended for metal to metal only. An old seasoned plumber told me this years ago and it has always stuck in my mind for some reason. I don't know if it's true or not but it scared me enough to pass it along coming from a plumber. Maybe he was trying to sell me off teflon tape (he used the plumber's putty for everything!) but I was young enough and ignorant and I have not heard otherwise since. It was just one of those things that made since.

However, I'm not sure I agree with dogbone's reasoning for the water refill but I have a Suburban water heater (the one with an anode). My manual has always suggested leaving the relief valve closed. This allows a slight pocket of air in the water heater which then allows for water expansion as it's heated, then when you think it's hot, you open the lavatory and the sink hot water faucet to purge any remaining air. Then when steady water is flowing I turn each one off. (there are three in my rig, but I don't mess with the outside shower, and while there is a fourth for the washer I don't have one.) Keeping the relief valve closed means that if there is too much pressure air will be released and not water - not so messy that way.

Check your manual, if you have one. Note again, I have a suburban Water Heater not an Atwood. They may be different. But I did want to bring it to everyone's attention.
 

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I assumed Goose had a metal plug,when he talked about the anode. I have put tape on it, then again sometimes I don't. I have the anode rod in mine also. I have used Teflon tape on the nylon plugs in my pontoon boat. I didn't like how loose they felt going in. I don't need water getting in there. I found some brass plugs that will fit tight, but then you have electrolysis with the different metals. That, I don't know how big a deal it would be.

It's just easier for me to open the valve, that way I can do other things while the tank is filling. Most of the time, I'm by myself, when opening up for spring. I don't have to stand inside to make sure that air and water aren't splashing out of the sink. Plus I know for sure there is water in the tank before heating it up. I have seen people forget a bypass valve and because they were getting water out of the faucets, fired up the heater with no water in it.
Spring is upon us and I for one, is ready to go camping.
 
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