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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi to all
I am new to the forum. I just got a 2012 Jayco Swift 154BH, It came with ST 175/80R/13 6 ply rated tires, the name on the tires are Power King - Tow Max.

I don’t like the looks of this tire, or the way it handles when towing the trailer, they have to much roll in them. I am looking at a set of 8 ply rated Kenda’s in the same size.

Does anyone know if Kenda makes a good tire?
 

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In this particular case, it might not hurt if you just don't like the tires. But are you sure it's the tires? Most people I've known that don't like the trailer's ride were able to attribute it to other factors AFTER they replaced the tires. Other things like axle alignment, worn or broken suspension parts and so many other things. I would think other things affect roll, not just tires. Between you and me, you want to have tires that roll REAL well... LOL. But I have a feeling you mean side to side. LOL

Brands aside, getting a more capable tire is certainly an option but you'll still need to ensure it still satisfies the requirements. Look at the load range! More plies may not give you a higher load range. Conversely, if you increase the load rating, you still need to ensure the rest of the suspension is designed to support it. For example, it does no good to get higher rated tires if something else is the limiting factor, like the wheels, axles or some other component.

As for those brands, both are made in China. Trailer tires from China seem to be getting a reputation for being problematic, especially ST tires (Specialty Trailer tires) and especially for high ratings. But there are other factors that cause tire failure that you just can't discount either. Trailer tires by nature sit, a lot, then there's the maintenance, care and usages that can affect them in so many ways.

Learn how to read and use the wealth of side wall information of a tire. DOT code, weight ratings, psi ratings, etc., not just plies. A lot has changed like how plies are specified so make sure you are interpreting things correctly, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
In this particular case, it might not hurt if you just don't like the tires. But are you sure it's the tires? Most people I've known that don't like the trailer's ride were able to attribute it to other factors AFTER they replaced the tires. Other things like axle alignment, worn or broken suspension parts and so many other things. I would think other things affect roll, not just tires. Between you and me, you want to have tires that roll REAL well... LOL. But I have a feeling you mean side to side. LOL

Brands aside, getting a more capable tire is certainly an option but you'll still need to ensure it still satisfies the requirements. Look at the load range! More plies may not give you a higher load range. Conversely, if you increase the load rating, you still need to ensure the rest of the suspension is designed to support it. For example, it does no good to get higher rated tires if something else is the limiting factor, like the wheels, axles or some other component.

As for those brands, both are made in China. Trailer tires from China seem to be getting a reputation for being problematic, especially ST tires (Specialty Trailer tires) and especially for high ratings. But there are other factors that cause tire failure that you just can't discount either. Trailer tires by nature sit, a lot, then there's the maintenance, care and usages that can affect them in so many ways.

Learn how to read and use the wealth of side wall information of a tire. DOT code, weight ratings, psi ratings, etc., not just plies. A lot has changed like how plies are specified so make sure you are interpreting things correctly, too.

These tires are not very stable, they have 50 psi of air in them, and with the trailer setting in the drive way you can push on the side of the trailer and the tires will roll from side to side, I mean big time! I don’t think that the side walls are stiff enough to support the weight of the trailer.
 

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You'd be surprised... it could still be suspension related. Does the sidewall specify 50psi? Does the trailer manual tell you what size, rating and psi to use? Another way to tell if they are right for your trailer is read the sidewall and check the sidewall for the DOT code. The last four characters at the end of the letters, DOT are the date code. The first two are the week and the last two are the years. For example 1010 would mean they are manufactured in the 10th week (mid-March) of 2010.

If they are older than 5 or 6 years they could be losing some strength due to dry rot which typically occurs on the inside of the tire and therefore you can't see it and is caused by too much sitting and exposure to the elements and being allowed to deflate. The lack of use makes the tires more brittle and prone to dry rotting than regular use that keeps them flexible (to some extent).

Then check the RVIA label on your rig or the manual and see if you can find the weight rating of the trailer axle. Let's say you have 5,000 lb axles. This means each tire must be rated for a minimum of 2,500 lbs. The sidewall will show this too. A load range should be shown too, which can tell you how much the tires are rated for. Even in storage the tires should be kept at maximum inflation FOR YOUR RIG, not necessarily for the tire.

It is very difficult to look at a trailer tire and know there is something bad, but if you want new tires, nothing wrong with trying to remain safe, just consider, that you could be wasting money if you buy tires that are too strong since they won't buy you anything.

There's probably nothing wrong with your plan to swap out the Power King with the Kendas, I just wanted to provide you some motives, reasons and plenty of information for your decision to make sense for the right reasons and waste your money only to find this didn't fix your problem.

I can also move my trailer side to side and I have a very trailer (38' long fifth wheel, 14,040 GTWR) and over 12 ft tall, 8 ft wide, but you're right that one can't be sure of how much movement is good, so I'm hoping this other information ensures you fix the right things with the right parts. Since I am confident in the tires, the load, the weight and the trailer's equipment, I'm okay with its movement.

Best of luck to you. We can all appreciate you want to be safe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You'd be surprised... it could still be suspension related. Does the sidewall specify 50psi? Does the trailer manual tell you what size, rating and psi to use? Another way to tell if they are right for your trailer is read the sidewall and check the sidewall for the DOT code. The last four characters at the end of the letters, DOT are the date code. The first two are the week and the last two are the years. For example 1010 would mean they are manufactured in the 10th week (mid-March) of 2010.

If they are older than 5 or 6 years they could be losing some strength due to dry rot which typically occurs on the inside of the tire and therefore you can't see it and is caused by too much sitting and exposure to the elements and being allowed to deflate. The lack of use makes the tires more brittle and prone to dry rotting than regular use that keeps them flexible (to some extent).

Then check the RVIA label on your rig or the manual and see if you can find the weight rating of the trailer axle. Let's say you have 5,000 lb axles. This means each tire must be rated for a minimum of 2,500 lbs. The sidewall will show this too. A load range should be shown too, which can tell you how much the tires are rated for. Even in storage the tires should be kept at maximum inflation FOR YOUR RIG, not necessarily for the tire.

It is very difficult to look at a trailer tire and know there is something bad, but if you want new tires, nothing wrong with trying to remain safe, just consider, that you could be wasting money if you buy tires that are too strong since they won't buy you anything.

There's probably nothing wrong with your plan to swap out the Power King with the Kendas, I just wanted to provide you some motives, reasons and plenty of information for your decision to make sense for the right reasons and waste your money only to find this didn't fix your problem.

I can also move my trailer side to side and I have a very trailer (38' long fifth wheel, 14,040 GTWR) and over 12 ft tall, 8 ft wide, but you're right that one can't be sure of how much movement is good, so I'm hoping this other information ensures you fix the right things with the right parts. Since I am confident in the tires, the load, the weight and the trailer's equipment, I'm okay with its movement.

Best of luck to you. We can all appreciate you want to be safe!
Thanks, I will look at all the things you said, and see if everything looks right.
 

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that sounds like a ST tire. more like a ballon, the side walls are fairly thin and have a lot of give.
sway bar setup or other (as Art said) are more likely the problem.
i have no idea if you could swap to a LT or HT tire (sizes and clearance are different), you'd have to research it and there's some debate about which is best on a trailer.
i say HT or LT but others may say different, a LT or HT tire is much heavier build than a ST.
 

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Just taking notes, it appears you have a brand new trailer?? So everything should be brand new!! Is it a 15' trailer and it is single axle? Single axle will have a little more tire sidewall movement than a double axle and up. I have a Keystone 18' with single axle and radial tires. Even with the required 50lbs of air at certain angles they look low and if I push my trailer hard on the side and rock it I can see the tires give some in the sidewall. Radial tires have lighter sidewalls. That's why they ride softer. How does it act when towing? Does it track steady behind you or does it wallow around or tend to rock and roll some? Mine tracks very well and does not wobble or rock unless I'm on a very uneven roadbed. Any single axle tt will tend to move around more than a dble axle. Most tt companies put on tires that are just slightly load rated above the tt weight and if you load your trailer quit a bit you could be pushing the limits of the tires. I triple tow with a 16' boat behind and the rig does a great job. I have replaced my tires with Marathons, same size and rating as original, and they are doing fine so far. Most of my pulls right now are 250 to 300 miles one way max on all types of road. Hilly Arkansas and Missouri interstate. Does fine. Have someone follow you on a decent road and see if it is actually swaying as much as you think it is or is it just a weird perception. If it's very bad it will pull on the tow vehicle as it sways and you can feel it in the car/truck. Hope everything works out and let us know if you find anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just taking notes, it appears you have a brand new trailer?? So everything should be brand new!! Is it a 15' trailer and it is single axle? Single axle will have a little more tire sidewall movement than a double axle and up. I have a Keystone 18' with single axle and radial tires. Even with the required 50lbs of air at certain angles they look low and if I push my trailer hard on the side and rock it I can see the tires give some in the sidewall. Radial tires have lighter sidewalls. That's why they ride softer. How does it act when towing? Does it track steady behind you or does it wallow around or tend to rock and roll some? Mine tracks very well and does not wobble or rock unless I'm on a very uneven roadbed. Any single axle tt will tend to move around more than a dble axle. Most tt companies put on tires that are just slightly load rated above the tt weight and if you load your trailer quit a bit you could be pushing the limits of the tires. I triple tow with a 16' boat behind and the rig does a great job. I have replaced my tires with Marathons, same size and rating as original, and they are doing fine so far. Most of my pulls right now are 250 to 300 miles one way max on all types of road. Hilly Arkansas and Missouri interstate. Does fine. Have someone follow you on a decent road and see if it is actually swaying as much as you think it is or is it just a weird perception. If it's very bad it will pull on the tow vehicle as it sways and you can feel it in the car/truck. Hope everything works out and let us know if you find anything.
Hi the TT is new and it is 15', it don't tow all that bad, but it does rock or sway from side to side more than I like. It's a shame that you can't buy a tire made in the USA. No wonder we don't have any jobs!
 
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