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I'v never owned a travel trailer but I have pulled livestock trailers loaded. I've been reading about sway bar control and have come to the conclusion that I need the sway bars but what about the weight distribution? I have a 2015 Dodge Quad cab and when I purchase a camper it will be no more that 20ft and gross weight should be less that 4000lbs. Would I need the weight distribution also?
 

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When I've pulled anything more than a popup or my canoe trailer, I figure the weight distribution hitch to be a good choice. Anything to take some of the load off the rear suspension. I once bought a 19 footer and had to tow it home about 100 miles before I had a weight distribution hitch and I didn't like how it handled. I also consider a sway bar to be mandatory when towing any large box - it's amazing how even a little crosswind, like a passing 18 wheeler, can push a trailer around.
 

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The load distribution is critical; if the load is distributed unevenly, the trailer will sway. Putting too much weight on one side of the trailer can result in an imbalance, causing it to wobble even more at first.
 

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The load distribution is critical; if the load is distributed unevenly, the trailer will sway. Putting too much weight on one side of the trailer can result in an imbalance, causing it to wobble even more at first.
I agree here, as i have experience with how a poorly distributed load will handle.
I was hauling a trailer load of roof-shingles on a pallet, loaded by the lumber company. the weight was behind the center of the axles, rather than a bit forward, so the load was fine at low speeds, and seemed fine in town... then we hit the highway... at about 48mph, the trailer and truck started to sway from side to side, and got worse with braking. my father, who was driving, immediately discontinued braking, and we coasted to a slower speed where braking was safer, then stopped and adjusted the load forward.

we were lucky... darn lucky! so now we both pay more attention to load distribution. when my 5th wheel is done being renovated, i will be very cautious in loading it with camping gear and supplies.

It is a real eye opener when the swaying gets worse with both more speed, and braking.
Safety is key, to a fun camping trip, as it is never fun to spend it camping in a hospital, or worse.

~Travis
 

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Owners of rigs who enjoy camping or driving off the grid encounter a lot of rough and rocky roads. While large vehicles may be able to resist these extreme circumstances, not all rigs can.
Uneven roads can lead an RV to become imbalanced. A sway bar is necessary in this situation since it will prevent any undesired movement and stabilize the trailer.
 
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