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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to be spending alot of the winter in my 1994 Fleetwood Bounder. I just got it last March and haven't dealt with any cold weather in it. I have city water source and I am planning to put heat tape on the supply line. Will the interior lines of the RV be safe from freezing at about 20 degree weather? What about the drain lines. It will be in the same spot except to move to go refill the on board propane tank so I plan in putting something in place to keep air from getting under the RV. I would really like to make a fitting and a hose to attach to a different propane tank so I wouldn't have to move it at all. Has anyone here ever tried anything like that. I am new to this and just seeking some good, sound, safe advises. Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Is anybody out there? I really need to know if the coled weather can be beaten or I need to look for alternate lodging as I am working out of twonn this winter.
 

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Congrats on taking the leap Brewer, I've full-timed for 4 years and Pa winters can sometimes be brutal. From my experience, I would recommend putting an adapter on your propane set-up so that the local propane company can come to you to fill'er'up.
As for skirting, I use a 2x2 frame under the camper with 1/2 plywood screwed to it after I insulate it with 1/2 foil backed insulation board. I use heat tape on my city water in as well as my outlet pipe for grey and black water, to date I have never had any frozen pipes. In addition I use the "heat-shrink" plastic on the interior windows , the kind you apply then shrink with a hair dryer. I've seen so many campers tape plastic to the exterior, and have to re-tape it all winter long because the blessed duct tape won't stay stuck in the cold. I hope this info's been helpful, and if you have any other questions let me know
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the advice. I had not thought of the plastic on the windows. Do you out the heat tape on the drain lines inside of the camper or just underneath it? Mine is a motorhome and has a large access space with a flip up door where all the lines are located. I'm sure you know what I am talking about. I was going to check on having them bring the propane to me. I hope they will bring such a small amount at a time. Thanks again Mark.
 

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I am going to be spending alot of the winter in my 1994 Fleetwood Bounder. I just got it last March and haven't dealt with any cold weather in it. I have city water source and I am planning to put heat tape on the supply line. Will the interior lines of the RV be safe from freezing at about 20 degree weather? What about the drain lines. It will be in the same spot except to move to go refill the on board propane tank so I plan in putting something in place to keep air from getting under the RV. I would really like to make a fitting and a hose to attach to a different propane tank so I wouldn't have to move it at all. Has anyone here ever tried anything like that. I am new to this and just seeking some good, sound, safe advises. Thanks in advance.
I've spent many years with just "passive" heating: no plumbing, sleep in a sleeping bag and turn off the heat. In the *RIGHT* sleeping back, getting up in the morning is just a matter of slipping a hand out to the thermostat and getting another couple minutes of sleep. It's extremely safe, low cost, and still not horrible.

Now, if you're going to be 'at home' in it, be aware you'll use a lot more gas, and magnify the tiny, tiny chance of a cabin-fire. Relying on indoor plumbing will be more complex, but if it's only you, you might get around that. Kids? Think again.

There are several good plumbing-advice places on the net, if you don't find what you need here. Google "rv", "plumbing" "cold weather" and you'll find what ya need.
 

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I personally just put heat tape on the exterior lines, as long as you keep the inside of the camper reasonably warm, you won't have any freezing problems inside. for the first winter I didn't heat tape the outgoing waste lines, only the city water line and I didn't have any problem, but some of my neighbors did so since then I've erred on the side of better to have and not need than need and not have.
 

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I personally just put heat tape on the exterior lines, as long as you keep the inside of the camper reasonably warm, you won't have any freezing problems inside. for the first winter I didn't heat tape the outgoing waste lines, only the city water line and I didn't have any problem, but some of my neighbors did so since then I've erred on the side of better to have and not need than need and not have.
Yeah, if 20 degrees is as far as you go, that's about all you need. In my trips, there are still some *really* cold nights, down in the teens at times, and we're just in Southern Indiana. :shrug:
 
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