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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone told me that parking my RV in my yard, on grass, is not good for it. Something about moisture and rust due to the grass. Personally I don't see the problem. Only the tires touch the grass. I'll be moving it and mowing to keep the grass short under it. Anyone know if there's any truth to this?
 

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Never heard that before. What about the rain? Maybe if the grass gets to long right up tight to the underside of the subfloor. That might cause some problems.

Welcome to the forum rickminwin. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, I agree. I had it in my yard all fall, winter and early spring and the grass just died underneath it except for a few strong weeds. THe only thing I can think is maybe tall grass and dew might bring moisture in contact with the undercarriage, but - then again it's a vehicle designed to be driven in rain and (possibly) snow. That would get things soaked underneath. Maybe the wet grass getting things like the wheels wet would encourage rust, but I'd cover my wheels anyway. I dunno. Kinda stumped. Thanks for the input! Off to Deer Run campground in Schaghticoke, NY this weekend!
 

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Don't know. Could it have also happened if parked on concrete? Sure. Would it? Don't know.
If I had to bet on which was better for storing, I would say concrete instead of grass - I just don't have that option at my house.
I can see my camper parked in the backyard on Google street view :)
 

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I would think that the smae theory would apply to cars as they do trailers which is DO NOT park on grass for long periods.

From what I understand it speeds up teh rust process underneath the bodies...

Weither or not its an old wives tail or not I am NOT sure but I do know that vintage car owners NEVER park their cars on grass for long periods of time so take it for what it's worth.
 

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RV on grass for long periods

I kept my 23' Sunline on the back lawn for 8 years and had no problems. We used it a lot in the summer months so I got to mow under it. Now have a garage for the trailer so it is inside in the winter.
 

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I kept my 23' Sunline on the back lawn for 8 years and had no problems. We used it a lot in the summer months so I got to mow under it. Now have a garage for the trailer so it is inside in the winter.
Thats ok if your moving it allot, I think the problem comes in when you park it for very long periods of time.

If you notice most Full Time CG's now put either pavement, dirt or gravel where the trailer is to be parked, this is to help prevent moisture build up.

Take a look under a trailer that has been parked for a long time on a grass lot, I garauntee that you will see a rusted frame...
 

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Just my way of thinking. The grass holds the moisture, as it evaporates and rises, it hits the cool metal and goes back to moisture and does it's damage.
My plow truck used to take a beating sitting for the summer. Everything goes bad when it sits around and doesn't get used.
 

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I have had to replace springs and associated hardware (brackets, bolts etc), brakes and cables, stabilizer bolts and some wiring due to parking on grass. It is amazing how much water/condensation forms under the unit. Go out early some morning and have a look underneath. I was told by a frame and axle shop that even gravel will cause this in some damp/coastal climates. The recommendation was to spike a tarp or plastic down (and then park on it to help hold it down). Air circulation will dry out any standing water on the tarp far faster than from the grass and soil left uncovered. I chose to pave my parking spot and have had no difficulty in the past 10 years.
 

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Yup, I'd vote for a lesser condensing solid surface. grass under anything where moisture can rise under it can cause faster rusting. This has little to do with damage to the tires contacting the grass but more on the grass surface being "alive" and causing evaporation to be caught and captured by a trailer's underside, not just the tires. Also, tires rot when they sit and this is a common problem with trailers that are not frequently used. The tires lose air and combined with the other environmental occurrences we just discussed this might even cause tires to rot quicker. If you don't have a choice and can't afford a concrete slab, just know what is happening under there to help prevent problems or explain them when they occur. It's about what is best for you based on all the factors. Concrete is the best, then it goes down from there - asphalt, gravel, grass, dirt, etc.
 
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