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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im new to the forum and I would like to fix up my old camper. I have owned it about 10 years, and now I have finally decided to fix it up and take the wife and child camping. I dont know what brand it is. Any ideas? It needs a front window and other parts and was hoping I could find a source for parts.

SOrry I havent done my homework searching the forum yet. Wanted to go ahead and get the pic posted to see if anyone knows what kind of camper it is.
 

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Well, it's definitely older than 10 years, probably more like 50 or 60 years old. It looks a lot like a "Shasta" which is a popular trailer from way back in the late 50's, early 60's but the Shasta was pretty good at putting their name all over the place especially between the door and the front cap. This might be another brand.

Every trailer from that year would have used the same type of appliances and cabinets and components in trailer construction. I believe the main differences between these manufacturers would have been layouts, outside paint and materials or some other nuance to create a difference.

You might try searching for "Shasta" classic trailers. There are a few "clubs" I've only heard of for these old trailers and maybe those folks can tell you what you have and recommend how to refurbish and sources for materials and components.

Good luck on the project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the help. I looked at some vintage Shasta's and there were a few that were similar.
My biggest concern is replacing the front window, frame and all. But I believe I can just measure it and buy a more modern window. Just need a good source for camper windows.
 

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vintige travel trailer

Definately looks fifties or early sixties. One thing I would suggest is not to pull it far on pavement with those tires and certainly keep the speed very low going to the tire store or better yet take the wheels off at home. You might join other RV forums like RVNET and show pictures because there are people still around that will recognize it. Does the inside look good ie. no leaks and a good solid floor? If so good luck and let us know how you come out, Gerry
 

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Take a measurement of the window and note if it has squared off or radius corners (rounded) or a combination of both. Note the finish (aluminum, black, or something else). Then decide if you want clear, tinted or blacked out glass. A front window oftentimes includes a hard cover to help protect the glass from debris when towing, so you might need a new one of those, too.

If you plan to do this yourself then you might also need sealant/adhesive, rubber molding and installation instructions in not included. Make sure you have all the tools beforehand and I hope you can replace it soon.

Take note of Gerry's concern. Trailer tires spend most of their time standing idle and rotting from lack of use (heat, cold, rain, sun baking). The tread might look great, but tires age usually from the inside out, so they could LOOK great, but be a ticking time bomb ready to explode as they are subjected to heat and pressures of towing. It's estimated that tires are good for 5-6 years before they need replacing. When you think about it you've probably replaced your vehicle tires long before that which is why trailer tires get replaced by age more than use.

Another concern with trailers this old is that the insulation of the wiring becomes brittle, might flake off, and need attention. Same with much of the plastic parts if any. You'd be surprised what you might find if you took a few panels apart and looked inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the tips everyone! Is there any online sources for windows? It has rounded corners.

The interior is rough due to leaks for years. I repaired the roof about a year ago, but I want to start working on the interior this weekend.

I also have the delema of where to mount an air conditioning unit. It used to have a roof unit but I removed it because it was doing so much damage to the roof by lack of support, and causing leaks.
 

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Here's a link to a company who provides some RV windows. The link shows many styles of windows most with radius corners:

Windows - Hehr 8700 Series-Radius Torque

About the RV A/C, these don't weigh very much and only need a 14" square opening since they are designed to be installed into a standard roof top vent. It would be much preferred to have it on the roof. Check the existing opening and it might have to be rebuilt. If it failed it's very possible that it was NOT installed and sealed correctly because any water getting inside will weaken the roof structure. You would need to take the ceiling apart to have a look. Then put new braces in place to support an A/C. Many forget that water does come up from underneath, not so much from sitting still but due to driving when it's raining, so seals are critical in ALL directions. It also needs to be very solidly installed too. Even if there was no wind and you are towing trailer speed limits you are already putting about 55 to 60 mph winds on the thing. Imagine driving in a headwind! Supported, Sealed and Solid is the way to go!
 

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another company that has been in the business of fixing Rv is this company call All-rite. They specialized in windows doors and anything that is glass. Here is a link http://www.all-rite.com/rv-windows-c-22.html but they also can build any window or door with the specification that you send them. The company has been in business for over 30years so they know what they are doing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
another company that has been in the business of fixing Rv is this company call All-rite. They specialized in windows doors and anything that is glass. Here is a link RV Parts, RV Accessories, Custom RV Parts @ All Rite Custom Manufacturing - RV Windows but they also can build any window or door with the specification that you send them. The company has been in business for over 30years so they know what they are doing.

That's awesome! Thank you! I started working on the interior yesterday, replacing rotted wood. I hate working with wood! LOL But I dont think it's going to be a bad a project as I feared.

Before I started working on it, my daughter said there was no way she would sleep in it. Yesterday when I showed her the progress I made, she said "I will sleep in it!"

I'm still trying to decide whether to put a window air conditioner in it, or strengthening the roof and going with a roof unit.

Oh, and the roof still has a few leaks. I did some searching and saw eternabond was a good product to use, but its expensive. Anything cheaper someone could recommend?

I will post some interior pics soon.

Thanks everyone for the suggestions!
 

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Eternabond is expensive because it works REAL good on an RV roof. Dicor is another brand that has a boatload of products you might want to look into. Don't know if they are cheaper. I have used both brands for different things (whatever was at the store when I needed it). I have also used other brands with success but with a prior trailer so I don't know it they are as long-lasting and durable as Eternabond or Dicor. RV shops have lots of RV roofing products (and check their catalogs, too) and ask for their recommendations. Some hardware stores like ACE might have some stuff that works.

About the window A/C. A trailer wall's strength is in the vertical direction. If you put a somewhat heavy A/C unit in a window the horizontal stresses might give you problems and trying to shore this up (don't forget the driving and the inherent jouncing and bouncing). To save some weight there are floor unit styles that could sit inside the rig but you might lose some floor space. These still should be vented to exterior wall but this would be way less stressful than putting the whole A/C in a window.

Also keep in mind that cold air falls, which is why most RV A/C units are mounted on the roof so that the cold air enters the rig at a high point and this is a more efficient way to circulate the cold air. The cold air drops towards the floor and as the warmer air rises it get sucked into the A/C first to get cooled and round and round she goes. Otherwise the air must be pushed upwards somehow to be more effective and you might be sucking air that's already been cooled. On a small trailer, that might not matter as much, but I just want to ensure you have as much facts about RV A/Cs so you aren't surprised by anything you eventually decide, then experience.

Sounds like you're real handy if you have turned your daughter around. I'll bet she can hardly wait when you are finished and she can have her first trailer-based pajama party (Of course, you're gonna have to sleep right outside the door to prevent varmints from getting in, LOL) While I am not brave enough to own one, old, refurbished trailers are favorites of fellow campers wanting to take a look at back when sizes and efficiencies. After all, without these initial pioneers into the world of RVing they wouldn't have their behemoth which came from these early units.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you for all the advice artmart. I priced roof units, and I am just not wiling to invest that much for an air conditioner, and especially in this camper. I am already missing the front window and all the wood up there is rotten, so I am just going to replace all the rotten wood with some sturdy materials and put a window unit in it. Not my fist choice of the way to handle this, but the most practical.

If money werent an issue I would buy a roof unit and eventually buy a bigger camper. Maybe this little thing will get us by for a few years until I can get something a little larger.

Thank you again for all the advice and support! I need it, because I hate working with wood and get discouraged easily! LOL
 

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airconditioning placement

we just purchased a newer camper in the same size class. It did not have air and hubby added a $100 window unit. welded a wonderful bracket and over hang on the top so rain runs off of it. Put it in the back window as neither of us wanted one sticking out on one side. It sits over the breakfast nook and is perfect just the right btus for a small camper. He also added extra outlets under the breakfast nook benches (as I wanted to be able to plug in my cricut and craft sometimes) and added larger amp electricity.We got it in May and have camped several times already. Have a mini home sitting in the driveway and love our little Mallard 13' TT as we can tow it, park it, and still have a vehicle to cruise around in.............You will enjoy it once you get it fixed up.
 

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the AC unit we used

is a small light weight window unit in fact it has styrofoam chanels inside of it to cut down the weight. Got it at a True valu hardware for $99 and another HUGE plus about it is that it runs so quiet......my husband loved that factor. He welded a custom bracket for it so it is sitting sound and even though it is not a heavy one it is protected and he welded a awning for it so rain would run off.
 
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