Camper Community Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Topo maps, gps and compass are kept in a water proof gallon sized bag. Along with my stuff for navigation I bring something to keep the bugs off and a water filter.

When I go on a simple day hike, this is mostly what I bring with me, besides a snack or an MRE and a pocket knife.

 

·
Camping Fanatic
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Two things I always have with me as well, compass and etrex. I should probably upgrade to a better GPS, but its suited me for what I do so far.

You get into any geocaching on your adventures? That's something I havent done yet, but plan to try out this year. What kind of treasures do you find?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
A TOPO map and a compass are always required. GPS is fine, but what if the satillite goes out? Always have a compass as a back up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
The compass should be accompanied by a map as well. The compass will tell you what direction to go, but a map will tell you there's a big river, canyon or mountain in the way.

Same with a GPS. I have a very accurate GPS, but it became much more useful when I was able to download the topographic maps for the areas I was visiting. Boy, did that make a difference.

My handheld GPS tracks by more than one satellite. The best I did was 10 satellites! WOW! If one sat or more goes away the others will help. I've used as few as 3. The more I find the more accurate the reading. I have had as little as 10 feet accuracy, but most times it's 15-20 and sometimes as much as 40 feet, but this is always been plenty accurate for me. I have been known to be off on the map & compass readings because I have to depend on myself. Having a Satellite GPS is much more accurate, but requires batteries (and more weight) for its use.

I like to keep everything in a small, medium or large daypack depending on how much I bring. I do try and bring the 10 essentials whether I think I need them or not. Sometimes it's others that need the help and they are so appreciative that I was able to bail them out of their scrapes (lost, hungry, thirsty, unprepared, ignorant or needing some kind of medical attention or advice). Out in the wild there must not be any strangers, so be prepared!

My Essentials are: (check the expiration dates where needed!):

- Water & filter
- Extra food or snacks
- Sunglasses & Hat, cap or something to cover the head depending on weather, but something for sure.
- 1st aid kit (don't forget tylenol, advil or motrin, some bandages, assorted size adhesive bandages, ointments, Sunblock, Insect Repellent, etc.)
- Raingear (mostly a rain jacket with hood and optional rain pants)
- Matches (or lighter) & firestarter (small blocks that light fast and can get a campfire started)
- Extra clothing (sweater, shirt, socks, undies, etc., it's about layering)
- Map & compass (I also have a GPS and extra batteries
- Flashlight & extra batteries. (even during the day)
- Small knife (about 3" blade). I use a Small Swiss army which has a few extra tools (but you don't need the one with 30 tools on it.

If something happens on the trail all these items become useful. I carry them in a proper sized backpack no matter what. There are lighter and more compact versions of everthing so these are not heavy or bulky and just not worth leaving behind any more.

More times than not when you read or hear about unfortunate souls who have a problems or end up in bad shape and need rescuing and it's because they DID NOT have these things. Those that survive and are found in good shape more times than not will HAVE THEM. This is a no-brainer. DO NOT rely on luck when visiting Mother Nature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Ditto to what Artmart posted. No matter if I'm going on a 3-mile quick walk in a local state park, to a longer outing, I now always carry the "10 Essentials". I've learned the hard way ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
I carry all those things minus the bug spray. I found that in the Army when we went into the swamps of Louisiana that matches are the best bug repellant plus to mention they are dual use. I kid you not when I tell you the trick. You suck on 2-3 match stick heads and when you ingest the sulfur it bleeds out your pores and the bugs wont bite you. The the sulfur last for up to 8 hours. We used to do it all the time in the army so I know its safe. If you live in the forest I wont recommend doing it everyday but a 3 -7 day trip in the bush is well worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
LOL... I would never base what's done in the service as justification that it's safe. I was not in the service, but listening to the crap my veteran friends and relatives went through while in the service, even they know it wasn't safe now. I'd check with a chemical/medical experts before sucking on matches. I used to chew on matches when I was a kid cuz I "liked the taste", but I also used to jump off rooftops and other stupidities, too and we know most of our childhood activities were unsafe and hazardous now that we're older and wiser.

Who knows how bad Bug spray chemicals will be on your body over time or eating matches for that matter, because they change your chemical makeup to those infernal biting varmints, but at least there is plenty of information on how hazardous bug sprays can be.

This is just another person's opinion.. But I did have to chuckle at Joe S.'s post in a humorous way, not with any disrespect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
yeah, this is very true but the body omits sulfur daily out of the end :)rotflmao1:) we don't like if you get my meaning. So, but yeah I guess checking the full chemical content would be the persons option but I still do it when I go camping. It all comes down to what a person likes and doesn't. I suggest trying it , if bug spray is not working for you. Now that I think about it I wouldn't recommend for small children until their systems are fully developed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
Wow Joe... now I'm intrigued... I have methane coming out of my body, not sulphur. I'd be afraid of chewing on matches because one burp and boom!

I use spray repellent on my clothing and lotion on my body. The best thing is bringing a kid because then the bugs will attack them and not me. So far I can run faster than them too, in case of bears...

Oh maybe that was a bad joke. But I've always heard that you always want to camp with people who run slower than you.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top