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My wife and I haven't camp in years. Now we are retired and want to get a 5Th wheel and see some of America. I see that some campgrounds have limitation's on trailers, such as size, age, generators etc. We want to do most of are camping at National and State parks. Is there info out there that has this info on the camp ground



Wanted to thank you all. I wasn't expecting such a fast and large response.
 

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Welcome :welcome:

I've never seen a National or State park that limits by age. Some sites are limited by the size - usually on reserveamerica.com or recreation.gov they will list the maximum for individual sites.
Some do have restrictions on generators - usually something like "only 4 hours between 8 AM and 8 PM", and sometimes they will have loops that are generator free
 

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Only the real high-brow, uppity, nose-in-the-air Private (expensive) RV Parks have an RV age requirement. A federally run campground will not discriminate like this.

Take advantage of the fact you've decided on a Fifth Wheel. Get the biggest and best 5er to live in a proper two vehicle (don't underestimate this!), then set up in the larger resorts outside the NAT Parks and drive in to see what you want to see. You'll save money not having to locate suitable site where some tree or tight turn will cause a problem (no dings, no dents, no broken trees or feelings). Most Parks have 22-24 ft limits and if you're like most retirees you are looking for comfort versus being cramped.

I have a 38' 5er and have been to Sequoia, Yosemite, Mammoth and not had any problems finding a place to set up, but I would not even try to fit into a Nat Park's primitive campground. First, it's not considerate to others (blocking out their sun, view etc.) and second, I don't like having to shoehorn into a site. RVs take up more space than they used to with slides, the tow vehicles, all the junk you can bring along, etc.

There's a lot more to discuss but requires much more information such as:

- Mental state: do you consider yourself a visitor or do you think you deserve to be there.
- Do you have to have all the comforts?
- How much do you care about others?
- How handy are you?
- How are your driving/towing skills?

Don't take this lightly. This might not make too much sense until you hear all the answers for each.
 

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new to RVing

All of the above is sound advice. By age I assume you meant age of the RV. One thing I would suggest is learn by talking with RVers and getting some good advice before buying. RV dealers are cut from the same cloth as car salesmen so their opinions and advice is very dubious at best so trust friends that have experience. I would suggest finding the RV first based on what your needs and wants might be and THEN look for a tow vehicle that has a surplus of towing capacity above the GROSS weight of that RV. Don't even think in terms of empty or dry weight you will never tow at that weight but most likely will tow near the gross weight. After you have bought your new toy take it somewhere close in the daylight and do a few practices of setting/hooking up and taking down so that you are familiar and comfortable doing it without stress. Setting up in the dark for the first timer will not likely be fun so know what it's all abouit before you use if you can. Good luck and happy camping, Gerry:welcome:
 

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around 30' works good for us, plenty of room for 2 and still get in to most sites.

reserveamerica gives lengths but not always real accurate, just something to go by. find a camper you like and go with it, be a little flexable and don't worry too much about it. it all tends to work out as long as you go planning to have a good time. :thumbup1:
 

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We want to do most of are camping at National and State parks. Is there info out there that has this info on the camp grounds.
Ok, the first thing you should get is the $10 (one time fee) America the Beautiful – National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass – Senior Pass (62 and over). If you're registered disabled you can get the "Access Pass" for free.
America the Beautiful - National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass

This will get you into National Parks for free and will often get you discounts on camping and tours.

You can use the National Park Service Find a Park Map to select the National Park that you wish to visit: U.S. National Park Service Find A Park

Then check out the individual size requirements in the campground section.

For State Parks you'll have to go to the individual State Park Websites. Here in California it's:

California State Parks Fortunately, they also have a page that lists maximum trailer lengths for all CA State Parks: Recreational Vehicle Maximum Length Information



Photo: McArthur-Burney Falls State Park, California.

Some State Park Websites to get you going:

Arizona: Arizona State Parks: Home
Arkansas: State Parks - Arkansas State Parks - Arkansas Tourism - State Park
Colorado: Colorado State Parks
Idaho State Parks: Idaho State Parks and Recreation
Louisiana: Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation & Tourism - Office of State Parks
Montana: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks :: Real Montana. Real Close.
Nevada: Nevada Division of State Parks - Official Home Page
New Mexico: New Mexico State Parks
Oklahoma: Oklahoma State Parks | TravelOK.com - Oklahoma's Official Travel & Tourism Site
Oregon: State of Oregon: Oregon Parks and Recreation Department: State Parks
Texas: Texas Parks & Wildlife Department | State Parks & Destinations
Utah: Home | Utah State Parks
Washington: Washington State Parks Home Page
Wyoming: Wyoming State Parks and Historic Sites & Trails



Photo: White Oak Lake State Park, Arkansas.
 
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