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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My truck is a S10 V6 and my camper is a Viking Legend model 2380 but it's a 1996 and I can't seem to find out the weight of it online. I can't even find a website for Viking pop ups. If anyone can help me I appreciate it greatly. Thanks in advance. :shrug:
 

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Welcome to the forum Indychic317

It will tow it alright. I think your S 10 is a little on the lite side (my opinion) as I would prefer to be overpowered than underpowered.

What consideration have you given to your shocks, suspension system, etc?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The truck is light. I was all over the place in the snow. Had to throw some weight in the bed. I guess I will have to just get the hitch and find out if it works. I wanted to take it to the KY Sprint cup race in July and camp there. It's roughly 2 hours from me. If it wont handle right then I'll at least want to take it to the Brickyard 400 which is only 30 miles from me and camp across the street since I'll be there Fri-Sunday or I could get a new truck. Thanks for the Welcome!
 

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To help out you don't say what year your S10 is. That would help so we have something to go on. Same with what the trailer weighs. You should be concerned with the gross weight rating NOT what it currently weighs. After you start adding cargo to the trailer and gear and passengers in the truck, things can change for the worse.

Note, that a vehicles weight rating will ONLY mean that your vehicle should be able to handle the weights specified. This doesn't mean you'll enjoy the ride, the vehicle won't sag a little, you can tow at high speed, or go up or down hills with ease. You just want to stay within weight to reduce chances of something breaking or getting into an accident because of it. Aftermarket addons are NOT ways to increase the gross weight ratings because what you add, might not be the only limiting factor. They might help with the ride, the sag and stuff like that, but anyone who says they do aren't telling you the whole story.

Sometimes there is a plate on the outside body of the trailer about weights - ALWAYS look for "gross weight" NOTHING else counts. You might also check any of the cabinet doors for a sticker as well. A trip to the scales will confirm you are withing the weights, but you still might not like how it rides but you should be okay!

Lastly, while the trailer might be okay to tow with the S/10, doesn't mean you're gonna be carrying a spare few tanks, an extra refrigerator, etc. Be very cautious of what and how you load your "rig".
 

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The only problem I have with the S 10 is that it was never manufactured for towing purposes. It's a run-a-bout and you'll see them around with a camper shell on it.

A very critical part of setting up your rig is your trailer hitch. I've been on the freeway and have seen a few of the smaller wheel base pick-ups towing a trailer similar to yours and that trailer was walking, we use to use the term 'dog walking' or swaying back and forth. The swaying usually kicks in at about 50 MPH, and what happens next the driver will try and over correct the sway and over steer which can lead to a serious accident.

Maybe artmart or someone eles can shed some light on proper hook-ups for your hitch. There is a rule of thumb that you go by in setting up your hitch properly which eludes me now that I'm thinking about it!

Have you tried towing your camper at all? I would always try and get a second opinion on your hitch setup for safety purposes. The hitch set-up is critical for any size coach, thats why the 5th wheel trailer is so popular.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
2000 S10
V6 4.3 L
GVWR is 4600
GWAR front 2500
GWAR rear 2700

I figured I would load cargo into the truck since I have a cover on the bed and not so much inside the pop up.
 

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According to several tow guides, it's still a truck and can tow between 3800 (6 cyl) and 5200 (8 cyl) lbs. I think the "run-about" was probably the 4 cylinder engine and even that would have a tow rating but I don't know if it would be enough for a 2,000 lb popup. Either of the first two ratings SHOULD cover a pop. But providing the year, cab style (crew, etc.), bed style (long or short bed) would help!

Beyond the 2,000lbs you'd probably need trailer brakes. If anyone is concerned about sway, the trailer could be loaded wrong (keep 10-15% of the trailer's weight at the tongue), you could have improper tire inflation, there could be a suspension/ alignment problem or you just might only need an antisway bar. Even if you rig is within weights all these others things must be good and properly distributed.

I wouldn't try to tow the trailer AT ALL until you have all your answers! You are trying to ELIMINATE problems not MINIMIZE them. I will continue to say until YOU are all blue in the face, "Just cuz you think you can tow something or there doesn't 'seem' to be a problem, doesn't mean you should, or won't have a problem"!!!!! If things break under normal wear and tear, just think what could happen if they break from being abused. Is it worth yours, your passengers and especially the lives and health of others? I didn't think so.
 

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Oops, just saw your post. Here's the tow ratings for your model year S-10 with the 4.3 V6 engine. There are several listed because you need to know more things about YOUR truck like do you have 2WD or 4WD, Automatic or Manual Transmission and what is the differential's axle ration installed in the truck (the higher the ratio, the more it can tow) and finally whether or not your truck came with the FACTORY heavy-duty tow package:

On Edit (forgot the link to the guide: http://www.trailerlife.com/Towing-Guide/2000-Towing-Guide/ )

5,400 lbs with 2WD 3.08:1 ratio,auto trans,heavy-duty tow package
6,400 lbs with 2WD 3.42:1 ratio,auto trans,heavy-duty tow package
4,900 lbs with 4WD 3.08:1 ratio,auto trans
5,900 lbs with 4WD 3.42:1 ratio,auto trans,heavy-duty tow package
5,900 lbs with 4WD 3.73:1 ratio,auto trans,heavy-duty tow package
4,200 lbs with 2WD 3.08:1 ratio,man trans
3,900 lbs with 2WD 3.08:1 ratio,man trans
4,400 lbs with 4WD 3.42:1 ratio,man trans
4,900 lbs with 4WD 3.73:1 ratio,man trans

The best thing to do now that you know the rating is to weigh your truck with you in it all the fluids/accessories, options, spare tire, etc. and know what the truck weighs BEFORE you load it up or hitch the trailer. When you subtract this weight at the front axle, rear axle and both axles, then you'll know how much you have left over to know how much you can carry and/or tow. Keep in mind that cover adds a little weight to the truck and especially the rear axle which means less for cargo or towing.

Then you need to find out the CGVWR. This is the combined weight of the truck and the trailer. None of these weights should be over. It is easy for most of the weights to be okay, then one of them is not, this means you are overweight. I hope you are starting to get the idea how these all work together. It's not just how much you can carry, but how it's distributed.

I still think you're gonna be okay. You might find you'll want to store more in the trailer and let the trailer carry the weight other than the rear of your truck. This is where most smaller trucks have a problem. Keep in mind only 10 to 15% of the trailer's weight is carried on the rear axle of the truck, the rest is on the trailer's wheels. You mustn't overload your trailer either especially side to side. Don't load on one side of the trailer or your truck. Only the scales can show you how you're doing and with enough education you will get there.

If you start weighing too much but still might not be overweight, then you might need to learn about Weight Distribution Hitches (WDH) and trailer brakes. For example, in California, over 3,500lbs and you MUST have trailer brakes (also known as a supplemental braking system). You might even want to add one to improve stopping power. Don't wait for the law to tell you what you should be comfortable with.
 
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