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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Having recently gotten another, large, HF case (and combined 2 smaller case contents to fit in it); I am reconsidering how I pre-pack and load the gear. Hopefully keeping this in mind will lead to more consolidation and an overall smaller load.

Due to limitations on the number of pics per post I will break the tread up into small daily sections.

The following are what I currently do; I am always looking for improvement ideas so, please chime in!

3 large HF (Apache 4800) cases in different colors so I know where to look (for what I am not finding...).

One case of cooking/ food prep gear
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(looks like the towel needs washing...)

one case of tent accessories;
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One case of wash/cleaning gear and random stuff;
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By using suitcase like cases I can more easily carry them to whichever vehicle (SUV or Jeep) that I have decided to use... and from the vehicle to the tent after I have arrived.

I tried totes but they are so deep that the item I want always is at the bottom and I have to dig for it, tried flat totes but they are harder to carry, lacking a handle.

(Note to self; figure out a method to help the cases stack better in the vehicle)...

Enjoy!
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Being a tent camper I tend to haul the potable water (usually in 5 and 2.5 gallon Scepter (plastic) MWC's (Military water containers) but occasionally in French military wine tins (on the left).
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Usually one 5 gallon (20 liter) and a 2.5 gallon (10 liter) can are plenty for a short trip (up to a week), by myself (I bring more for desert trips).

I try to camp next to a stream, for both the white noise (babbling brook) as well as to use it for a non potable water source.

If you haul water what kind of container do you prefer?

Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Water is one thing but food is another; because critters can detect it by scent and they too like free goodies.
Accordingly a bear resistant cooler and critter resistant containers are highly recommended;
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Usually this cooler is chained to a tree, critters have rolled it around, but so far it has not even acquired tooth marks.
Size wise; its OK for one person but too small for supplies for several people.

Dry goods like macaroni, snacks etc I usually repackage into peanut jars or Tang jars (white objects in pic).
These jars fit well into an, abuse resistant, 25mm ammo can, that appears proof against chipmonks, raccons etc (so far, bears have not tried to get in, as far as I know). A similar ammo can is used to transport canned drinks since a rough trail to the campsite can wear holes in cans left in commercial packaging.
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Bread canned foods and boxed snacks are often transported, and stored at camp, in a large .50 caliber ammo can; again, for critter resistance.
These ammo cans are relatively heavy steel but the weight penalty is justified by their critter resistance, IMO.
...its a massive disappointment to reach for a bag of chips, only to find they have been violated/pillaged by chipmunk raiders in the night...

Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
How about bags and duffels?
Personally, a few Bags and duffels, (not counting the chairs and fold up tables);are used mostly for soft things.
The soft stuff can be crushed to fit in those odd shaped holes when packing the vehicle.
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Top left a canvas bag for clothing and some shaving supplies (everything I need for at least a week).
When we did family camping everyone was limited to one of these (not including coats/jackets) to keep the load from becoming excessive due to non essential stuff.
Lower left, a US G.I. rubberized wet weather bag from the local surplus store (contains sleeping bag, stocking cap and pillow). Not compressing the sleeping bag much helps it retain the loft of its insulation and keeps it warmer. I haven't used tightly stuffed, stuff sacks since I gave up backpacking.
Dry lofty insulation means warmer; wet, compressed insulation, means uncomfortable, sleepless, nights.

The large black canvas duffel with a side zipper contains the large tent and stakes. the end and center side handles make it easy to carry. Not sure where I got it but the name Rothco springs to mind...

The chairs, end tables, etc. usually come in bags but the light weight nylon bags often get lost (they blow away easily) or destroyed and are rarely missed.

I also have a few canvas pilot's kit bags (also known as parachute bags) available, they are usually not used but can be handy for carrying folded tarps, folded full sized air mattresses, coats, etc... or very rarely, clothing on a month long expedition.
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Enjoy!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How about...
MILK CRATES... the catch all/carry all for vehicle camping...


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I have largely gotten away from these. except for stabilizing a 20 pound propane tank to help keep it from rolling around in the vehicle.
They can help carry odd shaped items.
They work pretty well to transport fragile items when padded with towels, blankets etc.
Bulk supplies like canned goods and boxes of crackers, cookie packages, etc. (note; they are not at all critter resistant and provide no dust/dirt protection).
They are great for keeping vehicle supplies (containers of various fluids) in one place.
Around camp they can serve as; foot stools, short tables when upside down, spare seating, trash cans, etc. etc.
Folded tarps, moving pads, blankets etc. often migrate into them.

Enjoy!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here is a duplicate of a post that I put in a different place;
It shows how the induction hob and pans are packed ,in a large HF case

I managed to fit both, the induction hob and the pans in a single large case; for portability;
still working on a case for the inverter...
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The lid is up side down and has the knob removed; to make it fit...
The propane stove heater is included, because there was a hole that just fit it.

Enjoy!
 
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