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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2010 Tundra crew max with the 5.5' bed. Is anyone pulling a fifth wheel and what type of hitch is being used?
 

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Did you get some info you needed, I saw Art posted some info on your other thread. If you need more info, let us know we will try to help out.

You done a good job with the hello!

Now for the questions about 5th wheel hitches and short beds....

Before you start, get your truck weighed (you, a full fuel tank
and all its accessories). This will be known as your unladen weight, or curb weight. Then know your Gross Vehicle weight rating, Front and Rear axle
weight ratings. These will probably be on the door pillar. Finally, look up the Combined Gross Vehicle weight rating (probably in the owner's manual). Subtract the UW from the GVWR and CGWR and you will be able to pull a trailer that will be less than these weights! It's less because you must account for passengers, cargo and the hitch hardware. The pin weight of the 5er is carried by the rear wheels and will be added to truck's weight.

Whatever you do, DO NOT trust the documented weight recommendations because every truck may be different by quite a few critical pounds and those numbers are only estimates anyway.

Right off the bat, a short bed will probably require a slider 5er hitch which weighs more than a standard 5er hitch, so this will allow less weight for the trailer itself. Some will NOT buy a slider thinking they'll not need it to save money and weight, but the dents of a truck cab are very expensive to fix (seen plenty of these problems) and then you'd end buying the slider anyway and spent more money that you planned to save.

So what are your questions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for all the help. The research says a slider hitch is one solution but ridiculouslly expensive ($3700) !!!!. The sidwinder extention with a standard hitch is half the price and just as effective.
 

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i use a sidewinder and really like it.

you should check and make sure with the manufacturer of the frame and make sure no issues.

i bought mine from etrailer online and installed it myself. less than 800 bucks. (sidewinder alone, no 5th airborn)

send me a message if you have any questions.

bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mine is a keystone and they stated they do not recommend alterations of any kind to the pin box.Out of curiosity I contacted two other manufacturers and they said same thing.My dealer says thats a standard liabilty avoidance answer.Did you contact yours and who are they? Thanks
 

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no i didn't, i kinda figured that was the standard answer. i just didn't want to tell you to get one without letting you know.

some say it puts added strain on the frame but i don't see how it's that much difference as long as you already have an extended pin box. the trailer weighs the same, bolts up the same and is the same length.

i do know that some companies are now suppling their trailers with a sidewinder, for what it's worth. just take it for what it's worth, my two cents.:thumbup1:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I totally agree with ya and my parts are on the way.For what its worth Camping World ( Houghton Lake Mich.) quoted me a similar price.Nice to chat with ya . Thanks again
 

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The reason live-in 5ers (with living quarters over the pin) do not want you to convert the fifth wheel to a ball or extend the hitch pin further in front of the front cap is that they incur more frame stress at the pin compared to horse trailers or utility trailers. The size of a live-in 5er is very large up front - just look at how high they are when hitched up and that should help you visualize the stress differences compared to lower profile 5ers used for horses and other utilities like car haulers.

I belong to other forums and the front cap has been known to lose welds because of this even when not using a drop down ball to bed hitch or if the new pin sits farther out front which probably increases this stress. I suspect this is why 5er manufacturers don't want you to mess with this.

I know lots of folks who have purchase slider hitches and they were not as expensive as the one you point out. They have pointed out that day you need it will cost less than the damage of not having one. I also know of owners with manual slide hitches that thought they could get away with not sliding it back, but they sure should have.

You can tell the recent foul ups by walking through a crowded campground and notice the corners of the short beds that either didn't have a slider or forgot to use it. Others you might not see because they already fixed it. They are out there for sure.

Good luck with your rig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the input but the price of a Pull Rite auto slide hitch installed is exactly as I stated. Three different dealers with 100 dollars. The stress arguement slowed me down a bit for a while also but a simple experiment proved that thinking flawed.Take a heavy object, a lever, and a foulcrum and it shows that the lever has to increase in size as the distance between the weight and the force grows. A fabrication engineer explained some aspects and he feels that the original fabrication should a at least a threefold safety factor applied and that the increased load should be easily managed. Of course no one will say "do it" because of litigation.Until I see a failed converstion myself or pics of same I can't put much faith in the failure speculation. Does anyone out there has any difinitive proof.And wouldn't Sidewinder ask for a disclaimer when they sell the unit to the user. Seems they would be vulnerable!
 
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