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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello My name is Bob Jernigan, just purchased a fifth wheel and have never used it..This has started out a little rough..Prchased it on Friday 11/4/11 brakes failed on Dodge Ram Tow veh..Working on brakes and had a garage fire all was a complete loss..Now I need to buy a new (used?) tow Veh..Any suggestions on what works well, milage would be a concern as well as ease of driving etc... I will also use the truck in our Ministry ( I am a Pastor) so it needs to be flexible. I had a Dodge Ram 2500 with a Cummings but thinking about going gas this time around. Bob [email protected]
 

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new tow vehicle

Unless your 5er is a pretty small one stay with diesel. By small I would define that as 6000 lbs GROSS weight or less. Sorry to hear about your bad luck but hope insurance can fill in most of the gap. We tow a 8,700 lb bumper pull toy hauler and I can't imagine towing it with a gas truck even though I know many are rated for that I also know what it's like in the real world especially mountains. Our previous truck was a 2001 Dodge 2500 diesel with a pull rating of 9350 but we just traded this summer for a 2004 Dodge 3500 diesel dually. It amazes me how much easier the tow is now with a 13,400 capacity. Let us know how you come out and if you have anymore questions, Gerry
 

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Welcome to the forum and it's very sad about the garage mishap.

I kinda agree with Gerry here. First, find out the GVWR of the trailer (check the RVIA sticker on the outside or inside one of the cabinet doors, or ask us where to look). Then multiply that number by .15 and then multiply once again by .25. This will give you the minimum and maximum estimates of how much weight you will put on the truck's rear axle. Then look for a truck that can handle the maximum weight you calculated plus a few hundred more pounds for gear, passengers, hitch and accessories you will put in the truck and add to that weight.

If you need more help on calculating this stuff, let us know and we can help out. If any part of the truck/trailer is overweight, or you don't know, then you are not compliant. If you weigh everything and know your numbers at all points of the weight, then you are fine.

A gasser that satisfies the weight ratings may be compliant but a diesel provides more ride comfort, strength and margin in the same truck. For example, you can put a gas engine in a particular Dodge truck, but if you put in a diesel, the weight ratings will be higher for the same truck. A diesel may also experience better mpgs over a gasser especially when towing. But if you have a lightweight 5th wheel, you might be okay with a gas engine. The gas engines are quieter, the fuel is cheaper (may be a tradeoff if the mpgs are lower) and the purchase cost may be less but you might not like how it struggles. Diesels are tougher, stronger and very durable. You must still ensure the weight ratings satisfy what you need. All trucks will be limited by more than the engine so knowing and meeting the ratings are important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you

Thank you both for the reply the GVWR is 10100 and it's a 29 foot Holiday Rambler with one pull out. Using the math I came up with 14,518 for weight. Seems like a lot of weight.. I did not even think about the weight just figured my Dodge or any 2500 would pull it...I might need to look at a 3500 with diesel after all....Gives me more to think about...looking forward to learning ...Bob
 
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