Camper Community Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So last year I went camping a lot May - Sept and didn't use any kind of gas stove or a gas lantern, this year I want to try using Propane stove + propane lantern. I am totally new to propane, never used. Last year I used battery powered lanterns.

After I attach propane to lantern / stove do I keep propane attached to lantern /stove after I am done using and keep reusing till propane tank is empty? Or do I have to detach propane tank from stove / lantern and throw it away each time I turn off and I am done using for a few hours / days? When your done with lantern / stove and call it a night and turn of lantern and stove and head to tent... can I keep propane bottles attached to Lantern/ stove to reuse in morning if Propane tanks not empty yet? Or do I have to detache them once turn off stove / lantern, throw them away, and then in morning when I wake up and use them again put a brand new pair of propane tanks on Stove/ Lantern?

Where do I throw away at campground.... campground dumpster?

...a buddy of mine said he keeps disposable propane tanks rolling around free in his trunk of his car all the time and he kept them in there all summer even on very hot 95+ days and they never exploded.... I am worried about safety and transporting them... gas leeking? over heating? I will have a rather very packed car this summer camping with everything stuffed tightly together pushing against car windows and ceiling... somewhere in that messs I was planning on tightly fitting the disposable propane tanks... assume thats ok and safe? Row windows down? ok keep propane in over filled stuffed trunk?

Going try propane this summer totally new to using it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Re; propane...
Small, disposable propane tanks are one of the most expensive propane sources, IMO; I try to minimize their use.
Not certain what is "officially" recommended but most of the people that I know disconnect the disposable tanks before breaking camp and leaving for home/the next camp.
For the one burner stove that I use I don't see any advantage to disconnecting the tank after each use. I just turn it off and leave it on the table ready for the next use.

It is very important to check disconnected tanks disposable tanks for leakage before packing them up. The, often cheap, Schroeder valve, that is opened by screwing them into the device, can leak; especially after tank removal, leading to potential fire or explosion. Its easy to check for pressure leaks with soapy water; just look for the bubbles. (Even spit works).
I normally listen for hissing each time I connect/disconnect a propane tank then give it a spray of soapy water.

I favor electric lighting over propane or white/cooking gas for the quality of light emitted; and the reduction in burn/fire hazard.
The small green "Coleman" tanks are normally one pounders.
For devices that consume larger amounts of fuel I use 10 or 20 pound refillable tanks due to the much cheaper cost of the fuel. I have also seen one pound and five pound refillable tanks.

I have talked to folks that refill the green disposable tanks, themselves; but, for me, the risk/potential consequences of a leaker far exceeds any money that may be saved.

I have never heard of a new tank leaking but I have experienced several valve failures (leakers) once I disconnected them. Some times the leak can be solved by reinstalling the tank then removing it again (recheck with soapy water).

Abusing a container of pressurized flammable gas; Is something that I would avoid.
A 20 pound tank can be stabilized, to some extent, for transport by placing it in a milk crate. I also tie it down with a ratchet strap usually to a roll bar.
I carry the stove's one pounder, with the other cooking gear in a plastic hard case.

When empty I just toss disposable tanks in the trash.

Propane itself doesn't seem to go bad I have had good results using propane that was in a tank that was stored for decades.

Enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Re; propane...
Small, disposable propane tanks are one of the most expensive propane sources, IMO; I try to minimize their use.
Not certain what is "officially" recommended but most of the people that I know disconnect the disposable tanks before breaking camp and leaving for home/the next camp.
For the one burner stove that I use I don't see any advantage to disconnecting the tank after each use. I just turn it off and leave it on the table ready for the next use.

It is very important to check disconnected tanks disposable tanks for leakage before packing them up. The, often cheap, Schroeder valve, that is opened by screwing them into the device, can leak; especially after tank removal, leading to potential fire or explosion. Its easy to check for pressure leaks with soapy water; just look for the bubbles. (Even spit works).
I normally listen for hissing each time I connect/disconnect a propane tank then give it a spray of soapy water.

I favor electric lighting over propane or white/cooking gas for the quality of light emitted; and the reduction in burn/fire hazard.
The small green "Coleman" tanks are normally one pounders.
For devices that consume larger amounts of fuel I use 10 or 20 pound refillable tanks due to the much cheaper cost of the fuel. I have also seen one pound and five pound refillable tanks.

I have talked to folks that refill the green disposable tanks, themselves; but, for me, the risk/potential consequences of a leaker far exceeds any money that may be saved.

I have never heard of a new tank leaking but I have experienced several valve failures (leakers) once I disconnected them. Some times the leak can be solved by reinstalling the tank then removing it again (recheck with soapy water).

Abusing a container of pressurized flammable gas; Is something that I would avoid.
A 20 pound tank can be stabilized, to some extent, for transport by placing it in a milk crate. I also tie it down with a ratchet strap usually to a roll bar.
I carry the stove's one pounder, with the other cooking gear in a plastic hard case.

When empty I just toss disposable tanks in the trash.

Propane itself doesn't seem to go bad I have had good results using propane that was in a tank that was stored for decades.

Enjoy!

Hmm interesting I have read that actually propane is safer than camp fuel/ white gas...that is why I went with propane instead of buying gas liguid to transport in my car to campsite. It seems confusing some say propane is safer and white gas/camp fuel more dangerous... and others say no white gas/ camp fuel and propane is more dangerous ??? It seems people have very mixed opinions it's hard to get a clear answer. The only reason I chose Propane over white gas/ camp fuel was people were telling me propane was actually safer? But if that's not true I regret my decision.

It says the 1lb disposable propane tanks can be thrown directly in trash if empty? I am thinking of just empting propane burn out itself after each use that way I don't have to risk putting a disposable tank back in my car that might have propane still in it. I will just let camp stove burn for several hours till propane is empty or burn the lantern all day till the propane is empty.

... since I can't use one disposable propane tank for both the cooker and the lantern right? I can't cook something on camp stove disconnect disposable propane tank and reconnect it to lantern and reuse whatever remaining propane is left in the disposable tank?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Just an opinion...
I have used many fuels and if you are going to use fueled apliances camping I lean toward propane just from the ease of use aspect. Until our politicians got involved it was also amoungst the less expensive fuels (in bulk).
The main disadvantage to propane is that it contains less energy than some other fuels. When trying to run generators on it it produces less power, It may also not want to vaporize in very cold conditions.

I tried many things and have settled on propane as my single, preferred auxiliary fuel for home and camping use... I really don't like storing gasoline. (I got an electric snowblower for this reason and I will likely get an electric lawn mower also.)

I regularly /mostly carry a part empty one pound can in the camping gear ...just be sure to check it for leaking before packing it up... the soapy water sprayer form the port-a-pot is what I usually use. I found a brass cap to help protect the threads on the one pounder and try to oil them after checking for leaks so they don't get rusty (from the soapy water).

Unless you have different connections on your devices I don't see any problem switching the tank between them (there are, some, adapters available to convert between different propane connectors to make devices compatible. compatible... I don't know how well they work though.

Some of my friends use a 20 pound tank and T fittings to run the stove, a lantern on an adapter/pipe above the tank and/or a heater... it does mean laying hoses around their campsite though.

Enjoy!
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top