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Welcome to the forum!

IMO domes should be better, in general, for high winds than vertical walled tents. My quick setup short weekend tent is a dome.
However, wind resistance also has much to do with the guy lines, tent loops and stakes. The only tent that I have had blow away (getting hung up in some bushes was the only reason that it was not lost in a river) was a dome that used a few bent wire type stakes in loose sandy soil; hardly the best setup.
Since going to relatively large formed aluminum military tent stakes and after I started setting up in tree sheltered areas, I have not had a problem: I avoid camping in valleys that tend to funnel the wind and on ridge tops that catch every breeze.

My favorite tent is basically a cube with straight vertical walls; I use either long sand stakes or nail stakes and every guy line & loop to to keep it in place, besides trying to maximize the terrain features/site selection for wind protection. I purchased some, relatively, long lag screws (ala, MacGuyver, a known poster here and on other forums) that should increase the hold down force; but haven't tried using them yet. Even with basic 10" nail stakes, though, I haven't had any wind issues with it.

Enjoy!
 
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Welcome to the forum!

IMO domes should be better, in general, for high winds than vertical walled tents. My quick setup short weekend tent is a dome.
However, wind resistance also has much to do with the guy lines, tent loops and stakes. The only tent that I have had blow away (getting hung up in some bushes was the only reason that it was not lost in a river) was a dome that used a few bent wire type stakes in loose sandy soil; hardly the best setup.
Since going to relatively large formed aluminum military tent stakes and after I started setting up in tree sheltered areas, I have not had a problem: I avoid camping in valleys that tend to funnel the wind and on ridge tops that catch every breeze.

My favorite tent is basically a cube with straight vertical walls; I use either long sand stakes or nail stakes and every guy line & loop to to keep it in place, besides trying to maximize the terrain features/site selection for wind protection. I purchased some, relatively, long lag screws (ala, MacGuyver, a known poster here and on other forums) that should increase the hold down force; but haven't tried using them yet. Even with basic 10" nail stakes, though, I haven't had any wind issues with it.

Enjoy!
Hello, I am Zoe, and I was looking for a tent opinion. I have find one brand that I like (how it looks) but I don't have experience and I want to know your opinion. Do you have any specific brand that you would like to share?
 

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Hello Zoe.
I haven't purchased a new tent in several years so I have not done the home work necessary to select the current "best" one for me.
An out of date recommendation wold likely tend to lead you astray, IMO.

Things that are necessary to consider in a tent, and that make a huge difference in user satisfaction are, usually, pretty dependent on the use/user.

I vehicle camp at unimproved, remote sites with a 2 door four wheel drive jeep or a smaller SUV (2 door, 4wd, Ford explorer) and have been pretty satisfied with Cabella's outfitter tents, hint a bit of research can find near identical tents a somewhat cheaper) and moderately satisfied with, older Eureka tents and my current Standing Room tent (requires a separate/not included, canopy frame and roof).
I have been dissatisfied with cheap chinese tents from wallymart and target.

I would look closely at REI's offerings then try to find the equivalent or better tent at a better price or wait for a sale (REI products have usually been acceptable but they are on the pricey/expensive side).

I would talk to friends & relatives to see if an older, antique, Coleman canvas tent can be found (their newer tents seem to be little different from other chinese made tents).

Make a list of the feature that you absolutely need; (I must have, for example; at least room for 2 cots and a porta potty, taped seams, a full coverage rainfly that comes close to the ground (or optional walls/liner), a greater than 6 foot interior height, a transportation weight of less than 75 pounds (backpackers will need a much lighter tent), single person set up, very heavy duty, self healing, zippers, shock corded poles, fully closable and rainproof windows/flaps, bath tub floors can be good or bad, they can help keep out water but can be a trip hazard at the door, I prefer heavy, oxford, polyester fabric, 2 level venting that can be adjusted, utility feed through openings (for the solar or propane)...

Hope it helps...
Enjoy!
 

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Hello Zoe.
I haven't purchased a new tent in several years so I have not done the home work necessary to select the current "best" one for me.
An out of date recommendation wold likely tend to lead you astray, IMO.

Things that are necessary to consider in a tent, and that make a huge difference in user satisfaction are, usually, pretty dependent on the use/user.

I vehicle camp at unimproved, remote sites with a 2 door four wheel drive jeep or a smaller SUV (2 door, 4wd, Ford explorer) and have been pretty satisfied with Cabella's outfitter tents, hint a bit of research can find near identical tents a somewhat cheaper) and moderately satisfied with, older Eureka tents and my current Standing Room tent (requires a separate/not included, canopy frame and roof).
I have been dissatisfied with cheap chinese tents from wallymart and target.

I would look closely at REI's offerings then try to find the equivalent or better tent at a better price or wait for a sale (REI products have usually been acceptable but they are on the pricey/expensive side).

I would talk to friends & relatives to see if an older, antique, Coleman canvas tent can be found (their newer tents seem to be little different from other chinese made tents).

Make a list of the feature that you absolutely need; (I must have, for example; at least room for 2 cots and a porta potty, taped seams, a full coverage rainfly that comes close to the ground (or optional walls/liner), a greater than 6 foot interior height, a transportation weight of less than 75 pounds (backpackers will need a much lighter tent), single person set up, very heavy duty, self healing, zippers, shock corded poles, fully closable and rainproof windows/flaps, bath tub floors can be good or bad, they can help keep out water but can be a trip hazard at the door, I prefer heavy, oxford, polyester fabric, 2 level venting that can be adjusted, utility feed through openings (for the solar or propane)...

Hope it helps...
Enjoy!
Yes, Thank you very much.
 

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Dome tents can get overwhelmed by wind. I slept in them with all of the poles taken out so they wouldn't be broken.
I just bought a small canvas Kodiak tent. Very stout in all weather. Heavy but very durable.
Cheap nylon tents tend to have fabric that does not last. They have poor ventilation, poor zippers and bad design over the doors.
 
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