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We just purchased a 1998 36' travel trailer with a bunkhouse. We are at a seasonal campground, so it's not being pulled at all. The upper bunks are rated at 150 pound weight limit, but we'd like to reinforce them due to the age of the camper. The lower bunks will be used by our girls (11 and 15) regularly, with the upper bunks being used only if they bring a friend along.

Any suggestions/experience on how to do this?

Our first thought was to take 2x4's and shore them up from underneath, basically constructing a rectangle frame with boards across the middle to help support the middle of the upper bunks. This, however, will take away head room from the lower bunks, and we want the girls to still be able to sit up on the lower beds.

Another thought was to screw eye screws into the ceiling studs and attach chains to help support them (2 to a bed). Another benefit from this would be the chains would act as a guard rail.

Again, this is for reinforcement only. Thanks.
 

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This might shore up things to maintain the 150 lb weight limit, but I don't think you'll gain any rating, because I don't think it's the bunk bed framing that creates the limit. I think the trailer structure that the frame attaches to is the limiting factor.

I don't think adding anything to the bunk bed framing will help. At best, if you shore the upper bunks and the bed does collapse from experiencing over 150 lbs, that there will be extra damage from all the other attachments you created.

Hopefully you can convince the girls that jumping into these beds or any other strong movements will increase the weight that is put on the bed and may cause a problem. For example, if they weigh 150lbs and crawl into bed, this should be fine, but it they take a flying leap from a distance and land on the bed, that same 150 lbs becomes much heavier and might cause a problem.

If you want to increase the bed ratings, you'd have to build a completely different structure that stands alone and supports more weight, and measured to fit in that space. Trying to shore up what's already there, might not help, because you have to shore up the weak points that you know of and I think it's the trailer structure or the light woods and materials that are often used in trailers.
 

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Well this would be my idea on how to give the top bunk some support all though I think about it first. What I would do is get about 8 2x4's and put a 2x4 extending up from each corner on the top bunk and then put a cross diagonal on the ends to give some pressure weight. Since the trailer is not moving you dont have to be concerned with movement causing the boards to come loose. Putting the 2x4 under would not give the right support. Also, when you put the 2x4 up I would use screws and not nails.
 
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