Camper Community Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi-
By October 2013, I plan to have a small trailer and efficient/trustworthy vehicle. I like the concept of the teardrop style. I love the old Airstreams. I'm frugal/cheap! If I venture into "Used", I need advice from someone trustworthy. I have years of tent camping behind me but want to be easier on myself now: dry bed, less bugs, etc. The vehicle could be a truck or small SUV type thing. I don't want a high maintenance gas guzzler. In 2013, I'll be on a fixed income w/o a cushion-yikes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
welcome. some of the new teardrops are cool but kinda expensive for the room you get (that may be all you need but the ones i've seen, you can't stand up in). might look at a Casita or Skamp, they've been around a while, should be able to find some nice ones used. i've never owned one but suppose to good quality. i've been told you can pull them with a lawn mower:10220:.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
Also keep in mind when you purchase a smaller vehicle, this helps with the gas only when not towing. If towing, expect the mpgs to go down a bit and much getting used to the noise and strain of the engine/trans, etc.

You'll need to keep in mind NOT to use the brakes unless you need to slow down or stop quickly. If traveling up and down hills you'll need to use the transmission, even if you have an automatic transmission. Make sure the vehicle can tow the trailer (look at gross vehicle and trailer ratings, tow ratings, axle ratings and gross combined ratings). NEVER rely on Dry weight ratings. A trailer is never at its dry weight as soon as you start putting gear in it. Same with a vehicle, you'll always be carrying some kind of gear.

Be aware of eager salespeople. Do not get talked into something you are not familiar with. RV living is complicated. Don't let anyone simplify it. It's gets simpler AFTER you learn everything. Keep in mind a salesperson will tell you the good things, not the bad.

Other things to consider:
1. weight management
2. maintenance of trailer and vehicle whether you do it yourself or not.
3. Using all the items in the trailer. Learn about them BEFORE you purchase the trailer. Afterwards is too late.
4. Packing the trailer. Just because there's room for it, doesn't mean you can bring it (see item #1).
5. Terminology - too many to list.
6. Hitches and options
7. Accessories - must have, need, and don't need it.

I don't want to scare you, but I've met so many people who got "surprised" by something. Best of luck on your new venture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
art stated the number 1 rule that beginers don't usually know "Be aware of eager salespeople." they'll tell you that you can pull a 40' toyhauler with a VW. do your research 1st (like you're doing) and you'll be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
I should have asked this question but I didn't quite know how to put it, but I'm not sure you'd be happy with a teardrop as your home. One of the biggest problems with new RVers is starting out, they pick a rig that is too small. They just don't have the confidence to "Go For It" (something big) because of the fear factor. With knowledge and experience you might find you'll need something bigger, but then you'll keep trading up so many times that this gets REAL expensive when leap frogging into a bigger rig and then a bigger tow vehicle.

You will find you'll need several things to be able to live the RV lifestyle. There is a considerable initial investment, but the RV lifestyle pays for itself quickly but only if you aren't continuably upgrading which basically means you are starting over again and again.

You'll need to consider a good size closet, considerable cabinet space, a large refrigerator/freezer, increases in utilities and camping facilities all over time. It's less expensive to pay for propane and electricity for a larger RV, than buying ice and shopping every day for food because storage is at a premium.

I hope you continue asking questions about this. The RV lifestyle can fit more people than they expect, but most people don't ask enough questions to know this. You'll need to consider, insurance, mail delivery, month to month costs of ownership and many other things.

I don't have many of these answers and might be ahead of what's needed, but everyone's experience and tolerance are so different, don't depend on just what I or individual members say. You must develop your wants, desires and needs to fit you and your lifestyle.

Again, best of luck to you and may your plans work out, whatever they are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
looking to get RV

Artmart's and bobrussell's advice is good but I would add go to a local RV show and find the size RV that fits your needs and DON'T buy there. Find out how much tow vehicle that RV requires, again not trusting the salesman but instead going by the gross weight that RV has, usually listed inside a cabinet, and figuring 10% will be on the hitch. After you've figured out what RV type and size fits your needs, get the tow vehicle then shop for a used RV that will work for you. I know it sounds complicated but to do it right the first time requires knowledge, patience and self control. Good luck and feel free to ask questions. You might also join RVNET. It's free and there's a lot of good advice there also. Gerry :welcome:
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top