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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Remembering all the fallen, American, Canadian, British and French. We will remember them.


Visited the beaches a few years ago from Utah down to Sword, then inland to St Marie Eglise (Red Buttons dangled from the church tower in the film The Longest Day), to Pegasus Bridge where the British Parachute landings occurred


Also visited Omaha Beach cemetery. Very moving
 

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I don't know that I'll ever get back to that side of the pond, but even if I did, I doubt I could handle visiting those places. Even some of the documentaries I've seen get me teary eyed - especially when they're interviewing men who fought there and they start losing control, unable to speak. I don't know how many have seen it, but I just saw the video of the 97 year old veteran who just did a tandem jump in a re-creation of the D-Day landing. Very sobering...

I've definitely turned into one of those guys we used to call a mean old man. Too many kids today look at World War 2 as something that happened way, way back in history and something that has no bearing on their lives today. I don't know that Japan alone could have defeated the West, but if Germany had done what it set out to do, (for lack of a better phrase right now) things would be radically different in the world we know.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-dday-anniversary-france-britain-parac-idUSKCN1T62FN

https://abcnews.go.com/Internationa...y-rangers-recreate-day-cliff-assault-63496727
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just looked at the videos. Very moving. I'll tell you something MacGyver, they have more guts that I do jumping out of the plane. I don't have the head for heights at all:)


It brings it home to you when you see all the war cemeteries in the area of what is all about. I apologise that I can't download any of my photos
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Thank you all for your kind thoughts. Its very thought provoking when you visit the various cemeteries and places where there were battles. To me, it brings it back home to me how close war can be. I've read quite a few books on both the first and second world wars. Apparently, during the first world war, if you were down in the south-east of England (Kent area or even London), you could actually hear the bombardment of the shelling. The one thing that I always found very moving, and has certainly brought tears streaming down my face is visiting the Menin Gate in Ypres (WW1). The men of the fire brigade of Ypres plays the Last Post every single night at 8:00pm. There were in total three battles, the third of them apparently was the worse. The Menin Gate is a large building which has the names of 55,000 men of the British and Commonwealth countries who died in those battles and have no known grave. To add to this figure, one of the cemetries is Tyne Cot cemetary in Pashendale (3rd battle of Ypres), which is the largest British/Commonwealth war grave cemetary in the world. It holds 12,000 graves, and there is another wall that wraps around the top end of the cemetary which holds a further 35,000 men with no known grave. In fact, I managed to obtain a red ceramic poppy which was part of the art held at the Tower of London. If you go on Youtube, and just put "poppies, Tower of London", it will show you the art work. It is absolutely amazing. It was to remember the start and end of WW!. Each poppy represents a Britain and Commonwealth soldier, sailor and airman who was killed. When you look at the video which is attached. It represents the fallen in WW1 only. To me, it brings it home, the scale of the carnage that war can do. My husband's Uncle was killed just outside of Armentierres on 15 April 1915, and I bought one of the poppies, which to me is him, David Garwell, who has now come home

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMxF3L2G0-4[/ame]
 
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