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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a model Sunset Creek 26.8 foot pull behind camper with a LR/DR pull-out. This camper has an all aluminum housing (wall and ceiling studs). Only my wife and I use this camper and for 6 months of the year it sits at our Ohio river campsite,after that it is in our barn for the winter. I have owned to many pull behinds to mention so I know very well how these campers are built, plumbed, and wired enough to keep them operating safely. This Sunset Creek however is my first new camper, so I can tell you I had no reason to inspect the rubber roof other than climbing the ladder to make sure my power vents I ordered were installed and there were no obvious defects or damage to the roof. So for the last 4 years we stood on a ladder, cleaning the roof with a light detergent and a soft brush on an extended handle and hosed it off. This year however I treated the roof to some Aerospace 303 sealer. I had to step onto the roof to apply this sealer and all looked very good until I reached the back bedroom corner. The picture I’ve included shows the area where the roof is soft and in the corner (4”x 4”) there is only the rubber membrane. There are no soft spots surrounding any vents or skylights that lead to this corner and there is NO visual damage or soft spots to the interior ceiling or walls inside the camper at this rear bedroom area. I mentioned earlier of my knowledge of how campers are constructed, I will have to admit I have never torn off a roof but I have repaired an interior ceiling before. I am scheduled to hear from Sunny Brook RV this Saturday and get their opinion about my roof. Any one hear of termites infecting a camper? Any suggestions as to my next step on a camper I still owe money on will be appreciated.

SunnyBrook RV Sunset Creek Roof.jpg
 

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Yes, I have heard of termites infesting an RV. If there's wood and a way to get in, the little buggers will find a way. One good reason I am glad most RVs have gone with an aluminum structure but that doesn't mean there isn't any wood.

But how do you know it's termites - it good be a bad fastening job at the factory and the rubber roof membrane just covers it up? The manufacturer will just say don't get on your roof. You say you've had it for 4 years the warranty is probably done unless you got an aftermarket one. But even then they'll just say it's a pre-existing condition that should have been addressed during the initial warranty - like you should have known. Good luck getting the dealer/manufacturer to look at this but I'd certainly seek an explanation - including that it's really termites.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have met with Sunny Brooks RV field rep. and while I watched him side by side inspect my rv’s roof and seam seal he found a 2” cut at the rear corner lap seal where the rubber top is attached to the side of the rv. When the cut when fully opened it revealed small amounts of black wet rotted wood. A smooth rounded 1/8” stainless rod was inserted 8” into the opening, lightly pushed upwards and you could see my rubber roof rise. He cleaned it out as best we could injected the opening with RV approved clear RTV and added the same to the exterior at the cut. It is now dry and sealed. He explained how this was not covered under warranty and suggested if the soft area was not walked on that it may be best left un repaired. The roof is after all functional as is……Tom

RV roof seal seam cut.jpg
 

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Yup, roof tears are not warrantable because most times they are caused by something the owner did unless you have accident coverage insurance, but you still must catch it early. Any damage caused by not inspecting your roof may not be covered (I hope you understand why). What's important is that it was addressed and some kind of repair instituted.

Termites or wood rot, both of these will cause damage. But unlike a house, termite entry is more difficult (not impossible) with a trailer. But in your case a compromised roof will definitely cause damage especially if you have rainy climates.

My user manual suggests periodic roof inspections. I do mine once a year but I don't take my rig out very often (about every other month for about 3-5 days) and at least one week long per year. I would inspect more often if I used it more often. Driving around trees will prompt me to get up there more often, too. So far so good, but I certainly know of others who have torn their roof membranes and sought repairs early. If you catch it early, some eternabond tape or sealant will do the trick. It sounds like yours was festering for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok, i may have cut this area when taking our camper to or from the camp. There are a few small low hanging tree limbs at the entrance to the camp that do brush along the top of the camper while in transport. Any case, i'm not fooling with this repair because like i see it, it's not leaking and it's sealed well and it's functional....Tom
 
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