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  #1  
Old 10-24-2011, 11:24 PM
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Default Advise on long trip please. Tacoma to Atlanta via L.A.

Hi everybody,
I did my first trip ever camping along the way from Atlanta to the Grand Canyon and it was a nice experience and a learning opportunity. Thanks to everyone who gave me advise

Now I am planning yet another trip. A longer expedition for sure. I want to fly to Seattle/Tacoma, visit my sons there and drive back my old Miata (which my son is giving back to me) to Atlanta. I also plan to camp along the way.
Since the time is close to winter, I thought it would be a safer bet weather wise to drive down I-5 to L.A. and turn left and drive through AZ, pick up I-10 and drive through TX, LA, MS and AL back home.

It's a 3500 mile drive, but I think I'm up for it. However, I'm totally new to driving and camping along the Pacific coast and I would appreciate any and all advise as to what I might expect weather wise and in all other aspects. Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 10-25-2011, 09:33 AM
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Well, A miata is not a huge car, so you want to basically pack as if you were going backpacking with some exceptions.

Tent: Get the smallest one you can. They even make a cot/tent combo you can set up in minutes that is just big enough for you and your sleeping bag.
If you want to save even more space, get a single serving size tent, and a therma-rest pad.

Meals: I would only carry foods that don't require cooking (so you wont need cooking equipment), and aren't crushable (like bags of chips). Granola bars, bags of dried fruits, etc. If you are just using the campgrounds as places to spend the night and then hit the road again, you might just plan on eating at restaurants unless money is a big factor. A small cooler that can hold a back of lunch meat, cheese, four tortillas, and mustard along with a bottle of water can get you through several days of eating and is pretty cheap. An alternative for hot meals is pick up some surplus military MRE's.


Heat: If it's going to be cold, bring some sort of firestarter (there are many threads on here about those), and just buy firewood at the park or store locally before you camp for the night.

Sleeping bag: Get one a step colder rated than the coldest temp you expect. Spend a little extra and get one that packs tighter. Find a fleece bag liner too. Besides adding a bit of warmth, it keeps body oils and funk from getting into the bag, and you can wash the liners much easier.

Shelter: Bring a decent size tarp, stakes, and some 550 cord. Learn how to make various field expedient shelters with it in case you are caught in the rain (though here in the south that's not too likely).

Last edited by Shadow; 10-25-2011 at 09:37 AM..
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  #3  
Old 10-25-2011, 09:56 AM
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Thanks, I am planning to start in the second week of November, may be earlier. I had hoped to take a minimum of gear. With the "vette I took too much and was encumbered by stuff.

I thought of taking my tent, pad & sleeping bag. Perhaps a tarp and some lines and a minimum of clothes (I'll stop and launder as needed).

I hope to eat at McDonalds and markets like Whole Foods. I will probably take water, a small stove for coffee or soup and stuff like nuts & fruits and such for snacks, but no cooler or a bunch of food and prepping gear.

I will take my camera, IPhone and perhaps a laptop, but that is all. I'll use the tiny trunk and the passenger seat/area (I might remove the pax seat).

I'm resigned to stay in motels in case of weather inclemency, but I really hope to sleep in my tent as much as possible.
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  #4  
Old 10-25-2011, 05:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverz51 View Post
I hope to eat at McDonalds and markets like Whole Foods. I will probably take water, a small stove for coffee or soup and stuff like nuts & fruits and such for snacks, but no cooler or a bunch of food and prepping gear.

I will take my camera, IPhone and perhaps a laptop, but that is all. I'll use the tiny trunk and the passenger seat/area (I might remove the pax seat).

I'm resigned to stay in motels in case of weather inclemency, but I really hope to sleep in my tent as much as possible.
You can get by with one of those small soft side coolers that is about the size of a purse, stick a piece of dry ice in it and it keeps stuff cold for a while. Like i said, a pack of lunchmeat, cheese, and tortillas will stack up in there and not take up much room at all, You can eat for a few days off that.
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  #5  
Old 10-26-2011, 02:02 AM
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For cheaper stays you might try campgrounds that have lodges, cabins or rental trailers. I know at least KOAs have Kamping Kabins and usually have a heater to rent. A lot of them offer some breakfast discounts elsewhere or offer a small breakfast, too. I belong to 1000 trails and there are few of the member campgrounds that have rental trailers but are not all are available to the public nor convenient to get to.

That will be extreme camping. If you think the Grand Canyon trip was cold, you ain't felt nothing yet. I like your idea of heading south as fast as possible then using I-10 to go East. There is still a risk of early snow since you'll be passing some steep grades getting down to the L.A. area. The days are getting shorter too and starting in Washington the days will be way shorter than further south and this may also increase the cold.

A Miata IS a small car and you might try researching a cargo carrier you can lash to the rear trunk lid to increase your cargo space.

I hope you have a warm sleeping bag and some thick thermals and something for the head.

I recommend you research the Whole Foods locations, because there aren't many. McDonalds, well that another story, but then there's also Carl's Jr. (maybe you know them as Hardys), and Burger King and Jack in the Box.

Another thing to know. I-5 is NOT a coast route. The coast route is called HWY 1 and is INCREDIBLY BEAUTIFUL but long and slow going any time of the year. This highway is windy and slow. Did I mention how slow it was? And the amount of services are way less than an interstate like I-5 or Hwy 101 which is a faster version of HWY 1, but slower than I-5. Did I mention that HWY 1 (aka PCH or Pacific Coast Highway) is slow. If you have time and money to burn Hwy 1 is the ticket but this is NOT quick in any way shape or form. For the other routes, do keep in mind the Western Sierras are about three times higher than anything in the East and they must be crossed even by interstates and even the deserts and Valleys can be about 3,000 ft average. I bring this up because this can make things colder in Fall and winter.

On the other hand, this sounds like a great trip. I'm hoping nothing I say should STOP you, I'm just trying to provide as much info as possible so you are well prepared. I've been up to Seattle from Southern California via plane, train, car AND pickup truck, as well as to Georgia and Florida by the same means, but we always get real lucky with weather (my wife thinks I'm brilliant that I always know about great weather). I love to travel, especially NOT by flying but have never had to do it in anything the size of a Miata.



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Last edited by artmart; 10-26-2011 at 02:07 AM..
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  #6  
Old 10-26-2011, 11:07 AM
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Thanks for the advise Art, I really need to know what I'm getting in for. I plan to fly to Seattle midweek 2nd week of November, probably leave Tacoma around the 11th and head South. I can make sure I have winter clothes & winter gear for the cold.

I have some time, but not forever (although I wish I did). Do you think I can drive 300 miles per day on the PHC?
I think I could make up some time once I get past Sacramento, possibly driving too long and staying at a motel or 2. I am retired so as you probably understand, I'm trying to save $$ so deluxe hotels are out. The camping is a twofold activity. Enjoy the country and save money! However, I don't want to sacrifice safety or basic comfort.

I'm prepared for no-frills camping for simplicity and expedience. And don't forget, I am traveling solo, so I don't need much room and my gear will occupy no more than 2X the space than if I was backpacking...

What are the chances to happen upon places to lodge if I cannot make a campground in time? Do you think the PHC has enough places to find simple food or facilities?
Please tell me if I'm being crazy here or if this might just be one heck of a trip!

Last edited by silverz51; 10-26-2011 at 11:10 AM..
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  #7  
Old 10-26-2011, 02:09 PM
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300 miles at an average of 50mph is 6 hours of driving. (I tend to average long distance driving time like this due to various speed limits and other stops. You can certainly drive 300 miles in a day. I have done that much just riding my motorcycle around joyriding before. Even if you are slowed drastically to a 30 mph average, that's 10 road hours. Still do able. That still leaves you 8 hours to sleep and 6 hours of camping/relaxing time.

As far as dealing with the cold: LAYERS. For quick adjustments in layers, instead of long johns, buy some large sweat pants and sweatshirt you can put on OVER your normal comfort clothes. Add to this a medium jacket, and some gloves and you should be OK. When you go to get in the car for the driving, just peel off the sweatsuit and drive in your comfy clothes. For shirts, wear a "wife beater" under a t-shirt, then a long sleeve shirt or your sweats, then the jacket (preferably with a hood or insulated hat for when you are out of the car). You don't want to go out and blow money on some arctic snowsuit you are never going to use more than once. Just layer up stuff you already are going to wear.

As far as being crazy: No this sounds perfectly reasonable and doable. As far as not being able to find camping or a lodge, remember: you have a car. If all else fails, curl up on the passenger seat and catch a nap until you feel like driving again.

Your Route: Google Maps is your friend. Seattle, WA to Atlanta, GA - Google Maps

You can look along the route for parks and campgrounds. Plan your stops head of time, so are not driving miles and miles after you are tired looking for food, gas, or lodging for the night.

Edit: As I mapped out, it is 3,504 miles. According to google, it will take 2 days 9 hours of DRIVING time, based on about a 60mph pace. I recommend getting a US road map and highlight your route, and pick up state maps as you enter a state so you can see more details along the route.. a US map wont show you all the little towns and such along the way. I suggest using a yellow highlighter for the route, and a blue or green one to mark places to stop along the way. Also to go to a campsite, you might have to go off the main route to get to it, hence another reason for the state maps.

If you know when you are passing through Houston, let me know, I can meet up with you for a bite to eat.

Last edited by Shadow; 10-26-2011 at 02:17 PM..
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  #8  
Old 10-26-2011, 04:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
300 miles at an average of 50mph is 6 hours of driving. (I tend to average long distance driving time like this due to various speed limits and other stops. You can certainly drive 300 miles in a day. I have done that much just riding my motorcycle around joyriding before. Even if you are slowed drastically to a 30 mph average, that's 10 road hours. Still do able. That still leaves you 8 hours to sleep and 6 hours of camping/relaxing time.

------- snip--------

If you know when you are passing through Houston, let me know, I can meet up with you for a bite to eat.
Thanks for the info, I was actually wondering if 300 miles per day would be doable on the PCH... I have found from my experience that it's crucial to arrive to a campsite during daylight hours. Otherwise setting up camp can become a nasty chore.. I usually find that it takes me about an hour to break camp and get back on the road after awakening. If I do not prepare breakfast and keep my camp as simple as possible, I can probably get going in half that time.
Generally this would result in me driving between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. That's 7 hours, take off 1.5 hours for breaks and that leaves 5.5 hrs. @ 50 mph, I could travel 275 miles. That's assuming I can average 50mph on these roads. I guess I could do better that that if the daylight hours are long enough..
Also. I need to know just how long the drive actually would be driving on the PCH. That would tell me how long my trip would actually take...

And thank you very much for the offer to meet in Houston. It might actually work out! It would be neat to meet fellow forum members along the way
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  #9  
Old 10-26-2011, 06:43 PM
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I have software that can plot a trip for you along PCH from west of Tacoma all the way down to about Santa Barbara, California. After Santa Barbara it's redundant and too crowded with traffic and unless there's something specific in L.A. (and there's lots to see), then I'd skirt L.A. and head to Palm Springs to head home. Let me know what you might want to see in L.A. and I might be able to provide the best route and times. It does matter. The L.A. roads are officially known as the largest parking lot in the world for good reason.

You aren't allowing much time for stopping and taking pictures. The views all the way down are famous and gorgeous!!! I'll plot PCH and tell you how many miles it is. There are also points along PCH where you will be hundreds of feet in the air because of cliffs (Big Sur California). The views are incredible. During each day you will find plenty of decent holes in the wall to eat or even seek a hotel. Just know they will be pricey so do plan some food to bring along to keep the cost down.

Then when you meet Shadow in Houston, he'll learn why it's slow and go along PCH unless you use a sportscar. Wait, you're in a Miata. That might count. But imagine you'll be stuck behind slower traffic and there are very few multi lane areas or passing lanes. PCH had to be squeezed in most of the way to avoid messing up the terrain and the views.

I'm sure I'll think of more advice and can provide more info. When you finally get to I-10, then you can really fast track to Houston and home. It will probably take less time to do that as coming down PCH the whole coast route, because then 600-800 miles is easy to do.



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  #10  
Old 10-26-2011, 08:25 PM
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Here's a stab at an itinerary from Tacoma to Los Angeles County with the predominant route on Hwy 1. I think this is very do-able. I used Trailer Life Campground Navigator to plan this.

Day 1: Tacoma, WA to Florence, OR - 330 miles
Day 2: Florence, OR to Eureka, CA - 270 miles
Day 3: Eureka, CA to Olema, CA - 275 miles
Day 4: Olema, CA to Morro Bay, CA - 270 miles
Day 5: Morro Bay to Palm Springs - 320 miles

This meets your criteria of allowing some sightseeing and departing late and arriving early within reason. The first day is when you start, so you gain time since you will already be packed and ready to go. Likewise after leaving Morro Bay it's not too far to Santa Barbara where Los Angeles county starts soon after that and you'll just want to drive through to the Palm Springs area unless you plan to sightsee in L.A.

Note when looking at map, PCH (aka Hwy 1) is also known as Hwy 101 which was the first highway attempting to bypass the very slow PCH. Then some years later, I-5 was built for those who need a real fast throughway. Hwy 1 is very windy and scenic, Hwy 101 is not as bad and I-5 is mostly straight as a rail and designed to bypass everything (like I-95 on the East coast).

Keep them questions and ideas coming.



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Last edited by artmart; 10-26-2011 at 08:28 PM..
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Old 10-26-2011, 08:31 PM
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I forgot to mention, if you think this is the plan, let me know and I'll start hunting for campgrounds first. I have other reference materials for this or you can search the internet.



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  #12  
Old 10-26-2011, 10:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artmart View Post
Here's a stab at an itinerary from Tacoma to Los Angeles County with the predominant route on Hwy 1. I think this is very do-able. I used Trailer Life Campground Navigator to plan this.

Day 1: Tacoma, WA to Florence, OR - 330 miles
Day 2: Florence, OR to Eureka, CA - 270 miles
Day 3: Eureka, CA to Olema, CA - 275 miles
Day 4: Olema, CA to Morro Bay, CA - 270 miles
Day 5: Morro Bay to Palm Springs - 320 miles

This meets your criteria of allowing some sightseeing and departing late and arriving early within reason. The first day is when you start, so you gain time since you will already be packed and ready to go. Likewise after leaving Morro Bay it's not too far to Santa Barbara where Los Angeles county starts soon after that and you'll just want to drive through to the Palm Springs area unless you plan to sightsee in L.A.

Note when looking at map, PCH (aka Hwy 1) is also known as Hwy 101 which was the first highway attempting to bypass the very slow PCH. Then some years later, I-5 was built for those who need a real fast throughway. Hwy 1 is very windy and scenic, Hwy 101 is not as bad and I-5 is mostly straight as a rail and designed to bypass everything (like I-95 on the East coast).

Keep them questions and ideas coming.
Thanks Art, this is about what I was thinking about... I'll have to see how the itinerary shakes up based on DW's desire to see me back home before I age noticeably more .
I would like to complete the trip in 10 days or so. !2 days counting a visit with my sons in Seattle and Tacoma and the time to get the car sorted out and obtain whatever gear I will need (which I wont take with me). I'm kind of thinking I might need a better sleeping bag that the Northface mummy I have. It's rated at 20 degrees, but it did not keep me warm enough one night in the South Rim. Perhaps all I need is some decent thermal underwear, wool socks and hat. But I need to make sure I don't suffer with cold or I'll be miserable.
Do you think the PCH will be crowded even at this time of the year?

Thanks!

Oh BTW, I found an incredibly useful app. It's called Oh Ranger! and it helps you to find campgrounds in whatever vicinity you specify. You can find it on line as well, check it out. However, I will definitely appreciate your help and experience. Feel free to make suggestions about campgrounds, points of interest, etc.

Last edited by silverz51; 10-26-2011 at 10:18 PM..
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  #13  
Old 10-27-2011, 12:37 AM
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The only concern about part of your trip is where you'll be when the Veteran's day weekend comes along. There are facilities all up and down PCH and it sounds like if you have a good idea on sticking to those stops you might need another day or so for the trip.

It takes me 4 days to drive across country averaging about 700 miles per day and with quick overnights, but then I've done hotels and Kamping Kabins and no tent to save time. This means you'll need to knock off a day on the southbound Tacoma to Palm Springs. I'll redo the plan together but your trip will be more driving and less time in camp for resting. This should at least help you know where to look for campsites well in advance.



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Old 10-27-2011, 12:57 AM
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Here's a new suggested itinerary:

Day 1: Tacoma, WA to Coos Bay, OR - 392 miles
Day 2: Coos Bay, OR to Ft Bragg, CA - 341 miles
Day 3: Ft. Bragg, CA to Big Sur, CA - 332 miles
Day 4: Big Sur, CA to Palm Springs, CA - 400 miles

Now we're talking. I hear Coos Bay is fabulous and I know from experience Big Sur is world famous for its views. And all the views along the way are fabulous!!!

This allows 2 days with your son, 4 days from Tacoma to Palm Springs, then 4 days at about 700 miles per day to GA, or 10 days total. You'll definitely need to reserve something well in advance for Big Sur and probably Coos Bay, unless you can get to some of the campgrounds in the area that don't allow reservations and just get there first.

I hope your "Oh Ranger" app can help find some campgrounds along the way if you don't or can't reserve in advance.

When driving from Big Sur to Palm Springs you'll want to avoid most of LA. The PCH from Big Sur eventually runs into Hwy 101 west of Santa Barbara, then take this to Hwy 118, around the north of L.A., then I-210 across the top then as far as it will take you, then drop down to I-10 in San Bernardino. If you don't do this you will be caught in some horrendous traffic at the anticipated hours of arrival. While most towns have a rush hour we have what's called rush hours. They last about 4 hours in the morning, 6 am to 10 am, then start again at 3pm until about 7pm or later. You're gonna have some anyway on the northern route I recommend, but I'm trying to get you around the worst of the all the freeways to the south with 4 to 6 lanes of freeway traffic that are jammed packed for 100 miles. The northern route I suggest adds a little bit of distance, but you will save hours of time. No doubt by the time you get to Palm Springs it will be dark and late, but you won't have much choice schedule wise unless you get a very good jump out of Big Sur.

Good luck with this.



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Last edited by artmart; 10-27-2011 at 01:02 AM..
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  #15  
Old 10-27-2011, 11:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artmart View Post
Here's a new suggested itinerary:

Day 1: Tacoma, WA to Coos Bay, OR - 392 miles
Day 2: Coos Bay, OR to Ft Bragg, CA - 341 miles
Day 3: Ft. Bragg, CA to Big Sur, CA - 332 miles
Day 4: Big Sur, CA to Palm Springs, CA - 400 miles

Now we're talking. I hear Coos Bay is fabulous and I know from experience Big Sur is world famous for its views. And all the views along the way are fabulous!!!

This allows 2 days with your son, 4 days from Tacoma to Palm Springs, then 4 days at about 700 miles per day to GA, or 10 days total. You'll definitely need to reserve something well in advance for Big Sur and probably Coos Bay, unless you can get to some of the campgrounds in the area that don't allow reservations and just get there first.

I hope your "Oh Ranger" app can help find some campgrounds along the way if you don't or can't reserve in advance.

When driving from Big Sur to Palm Springs you'll want to avoid most of LA. The PCH from Big Sur eventually runs into Hwy 101 west of Santa Barbara, then take this to Hwy 118, around the north of L.A., then I-210 across the top then as far as it will take you, then drop down to I-10 in San Bernardino. If you don't do this you will be caught in some horrendous traffic at the anticipated hours of arrival. While most towns have a rush hour we have what's called rush hours. They last about 4 hours in the morning, 6 am to 10 am, then start again at 3pm until about 7pm or later. You're gonna have some anyway on the northern route I recommend, but I'm trying to get you around the worst of the all the freeways to the south with 4 to 6 lanes of freeway traffic that are jammed packed for 100 miles. The northern route I suggest adds a little bit of distance, but you will save hours of time. No doubt by the time you get to Palm Springs it will be dark and late, but you won't have much choice schedule wise unless you get a very good jump out of Big Sur.

Good luck with this.
Thanks for working out the alternative, but I think I like your first proposed route better. The legs of trip seem much more manageable considering that the traffic might slow me down a good bit. Although I've never driven the PCH in WA & OR, I have driven along the ocean between San Francisco and Monterey. Beautiful drive, but not if you want to make good time on a trip....
Also, I was reading about the parks near Florence OR, and they sure look inviting... Particularly since they even have yurts and tepees available for camping out of the rain if needed. It's a more expensive than a tent site but less than half of a cheap roach motel.

I think I rather extend my trip 2 extra days and enjoy the PCH. I might reconsider the food and see if I can carry at least a day's supply of food that I can prepare myself. I could theoretically shop every day and not carry too much food. Maybe one of those very small coolers can hold enough food for a day or 2. The only problem is wasting all the ice that needs to be purchased but wont fit there with the food...

Another possibility might be to get one meal per day at a cheap Mexican or Chinese restaurant. Breakfast at Mikey D's is not bad at all and snacks could carry the rest of the day. Fortunately I am not very large and can get by without consuming lots of calories. Actually, eating too much is more likely a problem since the average serving size in restaurants is pretty dang big.
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