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  #16  
Old 08-26-2011, 01:36 PM
Camping Guru
Camper Type: 5th Wheel
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Murrieta, CA
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Yes, I was referring to the prior post... Notice the time stamps, we posted within 5 minutes of each other and his posted first.... which makes it read funny.

Moving right along, my first aid kit is very similar to Peanut's. I like the Immodium and ice pack idea.

To his list I add plenty of moleskin/molefoam, Motrin instead of Advil because it seems to work better for me. I don't carry scissors since I carry a Swiss Army knife which has tweezers. I carry small heat packs, too. I don't carry a thermometer since I can tell when I or the people I'm with, feel like crap and know to vacate when that happens. It's happened once to a person in our party.

Making your own kit is best as long as you have the experience on what to bring and use. This helps to replenish supplies and get rid of old stuff. It also helps to customize the kit as needed. I'll take one kit for backpacking since size and weight are critical. Then there's a different one for tenting and finally, a big one for the RV (but not that big since I'm not a doctor).



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Art
Murrieta, CA

2006 Ford F-250/350
2006 Montana 3500RL
Tent & Backpack with all the gear

Last edited by artmart; 08-26-2011 at 01:40 PM..
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  #17  
Old 09-06-2011, 01:07 AM
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Location: Pittsburgh , PA
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add superglue to the first aid kids. Stitches in a tube!
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  #18  
Old 09-06-2011, 07:14 AM
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Location: georgia
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Great suggestion about the superglue! I once put my kids scalp back together after he split it on a pole. The cut was only about an inch long, but the superglue did the job. I wouldn't try to do that with an especially deep or long cut,but for something small (and easily cleaned out!) superglue will work well.
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  #19  
Old 09-06-2011, 07:33 AM
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Location: Pittsburgh , PA
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I'm a remodeling contractor, and on site cuts are part of the workday. Years ago I did a remodel for an ER Doc. Got to run my method past him.

Up to that point, I'd been doing it wrong. I squirted the glue into the wound. He suggested cleaning, then hold closed, then 3 to 5 thin layers, allowing each to dry quick, as opposed to one thick layer.

It was a steel stud job, lotsa oportunity to practice with all the sharp metal edges around. Helper managed to slice his hand pretty good. We took the time to glue it "right", Doc gave his seal of approval, said we saved a $350 ER trip!

Also confirmed, infection sets in 24 to 48 hours. Means nothing if no signs earlier, but you are usually in the clear if all looks good 48hrs later. Good stuff to know.

He did laugh at my "deep cut/gash method". Big dollap of liquid nails into the wound, squeeze excess out as you close it. Then wrap w/blue shop towel and duct tape tight!

Something about chance for massive infection and chemical burns/nerve damage?

I've superglued my wife and kids, save the liquid nails for myself!
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  #20  
Old 09-06-2011, 07:36 AM
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Location: Pittsburgh , PA
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He was however impressed with the blue shop towel and duct tape. Liked the constant pressure for slowing blood flow giving chance to clot.as a rule, I don't travel very far without duct tape, and usually have a roll of shop towels somewhere in the truck.
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  #21  
Old 09-06-2011, 10:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbuck View Post
I'm a remodeling contractor, and on site cuts are part of the workday. Years ago I did a remodel for an ER Doc. Got to run my method past him.

Up to that point, I'd been doing it wrong. I squirted the glue into the wound. He suggested cleaning, then hold closed, then 3 to 5 thin layers, allowing each to dry quick, as opposed to one thick layer.

It was a steel stud job, lotsa oportunity to practice with all the sharp metal edges around. Helper managed to slice his hand pretty good. We took the time to glue it "right", Doc gave his seal of approval, said we saved a $350 ER trip!

Also confirmed, infection sets in 24 to 48 hours. Means nothing if no signs earlier, but you are usually in the clear if all looks good 48hrs later. Good stuff to know.

He did laugh at my "deep cut/gash method". Big dollap of liquid nails into the wound, squeeze excess out as you close it. Then wrap w/blue shop towel and duct tape tight!

Something about chance for massive infection and chemical burns/nerve damage?

I've superglued my wife and kids, save the liquid nails for myself!
OMG, I think my brain just went sideways! Glad it turned out all right. You bring up an important point though. If the cut is not easy to clean out or has significant contamination, DO NOT glue it closed. The cleaning out is so important. And not just running it under some cold water. No. Cleaning involved soap and water and SCRUBBING, to get the germs out. If you can't stand to scrub it, you best leave it to the professionals.

I'm a nurse. One time i had a guy walk in to the ER with his thumb flayed open. He had laid his thumb down on a chain saw~!~ and it was just full of sticks, dirt, and grease. Holy cow. I don't think I've ever seen anything so nasty. It was so bad the doctor couldn't even sew it up, let alone glue it. Just had to leave it open and pack it. Poor guy nearly lost the thumb due to infection, but managed somehow to save it. As he said to me, "that's a mistake I'll never make again." No kidding!
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  #22  
Old 10-11-2011, 07:35 AM
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Hi there! My list is made of things I could never go without, but I must admit I copied it from a great list for gear check, cause I've never thought what is essential and what's not. My list is much bigger than artmart's, which means everything is important and I pack everything I might need for camping. Doesn't matter if I haven't used it since I bought it. I need to have it in case something happens and luckily nothing bad ever happens

Here it is:

Personal water bottles
First aid kit
Mozzie net/screen
Flashlight
Emergency contact numbers
Cooler/fridge
Portable camping gas stove
Iron pot pan cookware
Camping picnic table plus chair set
Camping kitchen knives and other cooking tools
Waterproof bags
Digital camera, spare batteries
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  #23  
Old 10-12-2011, 12:56 AM
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Thanks for your lists Alice. My lists are short but this is because the list only includes those items that must be included for every outing, no matter what type. From a short day hike to a 2 week long trip in an RV. Those are what I refer to as ESSENTIAL MUST HAVES no matter what.

Your list is what you (and I) would use on a camping trip and then some. For example, if you were backpacking you would skip the cooler/fridge amongst other things.

If you are RVing, you'd could add a whole lot more, like baking pans, and satellite TV stuff and other stuff.

I think that lists are always the best way to go. I also have a line next to each item, to check off if I need it or don't. I have a basic list that can easily be modified for tent camping, truck camping, backpacking and a whole different set of lists for RVing. Amazingly enough, the RV checklist is relatively short in equipment because the trailer is ALWAYS stocked with what is needed. What will be different is those things that might change like food items or clothing items.

I think the best thing you are pointing out that a very important camping tip is to USE lists. As many as you need to ensure you always have what you need. This has worked for me for the past 30 years. And I have been learning to use checklists for many other things than just camping. Great advice!



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Murrieta, CA

2006 Ford F-250/350
2006 Montana 3500RL
Tent & Backpack with all the gear
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  #24  
Old 10-12-2011, 06:01 AM
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My essential camping musts include:
-food
-lots of water
-first aid kit
-extra clothes
-fire starter
-coffee
-cellphone

I know that the last one may not really be considered as a camping must, but I always bring it with me for the maps and at least I got a way to contact for help, if I need to.
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  #25  
Old 10-12-2011, 10:53 AM
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I do bring a cellphone since these are becoming important, but most times where I go, it is just extra weight. I keep it turned off to save the battery and only power it up if I think I might get a signal (which is rare). The intention is to keep it as powered up for an outbound call in case of emergency not to be able to receive calls.

I am not a text-er and haven't got the strength or money to carry a solar charger yet, but I can see this requirement for future hikers and backpackers as technology gets better.

I do bring a handheld GPS and leave the map and compass in the pack for backup. But so far after getting use to it, the GPS was been outstanding, easy to use and provides so much more info and capability than the map/compass method. This means I carry more batteries too.



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2006 Ford F-250/350
2006 Montana 3500RL
Tent & Backpack with all the gear
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  #26  
Old 10-22-2011, 02:03 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2011
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I know it's definitely a sign of the times to bring along the tech stuff, but besides the essentials (water, first aid kit, skin so soft, flashlight, food, stove and/or fire), I can't live without having my camera, GPS, cell phone, iPod and iMainGo X speakers on hand. Which, BTW, I absolutely love the iMainGo speakers. They're battery powered and super portable (plus great sound). I work with them and their products are pretty impressive out of all the speaker systems I've used. The best part is that it's also a case, so it protects the iPod at the same time. They carry them at REI and Amazon. If you want to check them out, here's a link to Amazon (where there are also some pretty great reviews): Amazon.com: "imaingo": Electronics.

Happy camping!
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  #27  
Old 10-24-2011, 09:45 PM
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Never really knew about the superglue. I'll definitely add that in my first aid kit, especially after reading the right way on how to use it.

peanut: How about cleaning the wound with some hydrogen peroxide and then dabbing some iodine? Will they be able to get the wound clean enough? I don't mind scrubbing a bit if it's just a small cut. But the idea of scrubbing a nasty cut can be a whole different matter to me.
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  #28  
Old 10-25-2011, 06:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwinjd View Post
Never really knew about the superglue. I'll definitely add that in my first aid kit, especially after reading the right way on how to use it.

peanut: How about cleaning the wound with some hydrogen peroxide and then dabbing some iodine? Will they be able to get the wound clean enough? I don't mind scrubbing a bit if it's just a small cut. But the idea of scrubbing a nasty cut can be a whole different matter to me.
For oddball uses of superglue check out: Cyanoacrylate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

One of the best things to get for washing out cuts is Wound Wash. It's also good for sterylizing burned skin before bandaging.


My friend is a paramedic, and when I burned my arm on my motorcycle muffler (trying to do emergency repair on the road ) she gave me some wound wash to clean the area with and dry gauze to wrap it in. Maybe not something to carry backpacking if you consider 3 oz to be heavy, but definitely something to keep in the base-camp medic bag.
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  #29  
Old 11-16-2011, 06:03 AM
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I think you would get your safest answer from R.E.I. They have very good reliable products. Good luck.
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  #30  
Old 03-17-2013, 04:12 PM
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Default LOG TEEPEE Campfire Grate

The Log Teepee Campfire Grate is designed to hold your firewood in a upright teepee style position for more air and a better burning campfire. "You"ll Never Make Another Campfire Without It Again". A great gift for the person that loves camping. Made in Wisconsin. Visit: www.logteepee.com for more info or ordering.
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