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Power Requirements for a 28' TT

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  #1  
Old 10-08-2011, 05:13 PM
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Camper Type: Travel Trailer
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Northern New Mexico
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Default Power Requirements for a 28' TT

Hi everybody. We receintly bought an Aljo Joey 260 Travel Trailer. It's just under 28 feet and suits our needs perfectly. So far we have been utilizing full hook-ups, but we see ourselves doing some "dry camping" next year. Here is a quesiton for the experts: What size portable generator do you recommend we buy?

As an aside, we have access to a near-new Yamaha 2000iS for $400
(retail is $1,200). It has a Rated A/C Output of 1,600 watts and a Maximum A/C Output of 2000 watts. I am told that this would be too small for us, but I read somewhere where two of these can be combined to provide the power we need. So, the next question is: Should be buy this 2000iS and combine it with another 2000iS?

Thanks in advance for any advice you can provide.

Peter and Vicki
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  #2  
Old 10-08-2011, 11:26 PM
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Location: Murrieta, CA
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You will need a second generator if you can find a parallel wire kit and connector for it (the 2000iS is a Yamaha, isn't it?). This will provide 4000 watts peak and about 3200 watts run time. A 30 amp rig requires between 3500 & 4000 watts of generator to run comfortably when things start up and about 3200 when everything is running. I still wouldn't try and run the A/C, the Microwave and the Hair dryers all at the same time. That might blow out 30 amps, too.

Many RVers (like me) run two Honda 2000s in this manner. Honda was the first "true sine wave" systems that allowed the parallel operation to double capacity. The advantage to this system, is that each generator weighs less than 50 pounds and is light enough for one person. The disadvantage to this system is its portability.

You'll need to look into ways to secure these so someone else doesn't walk away with them. Another disadvantage is the run time minutes, but there are fuel kits that allow owners to run their Hondas much longer before refueling, otherwise you are refueling just about every day.



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  #3  
Old 10-09-2011, 01:17 PM
Camper
Camper Type: Travel Trailer
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Northern New Mexico
Posts: 9
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Thanks for the input. We found a parallel wire kit on the web. Looks like we're good to go. Before I sign off however, let me ask one more question....................

Assuming we hook up two Yamaga 2000iS generators in parallel (using the parallel wire kit), if everything is up and running and THEN we turn on the air conditioning, I now understand that we run the risk of blowing something (a fuse or the air conditioner). Would it be okay to fire up the air conditioner FIRST, get it up and running, and then turn everything else on (everything else meaning the "microwave and hair dryers"?) If this is okay, what happens when the air conditioner cycles on and off? Thanks again for all your help.
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  #4  
Old 10-10-2011, 10:24 AM
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I'm guessing two of those things need to fire up at the same time for a circuit to blow. But that's the extent of it. If they do cycle on and at the same time draw too much current a circuit breaker resets and all is "safe".

You might need to do some checking, but if the A/C is already running it might use way less power than when it's starting up. Combined with whatever the converter is using and then you fire up the microwave, there is a chance of something happening. If you are concerned, just switch off the A/C for the few minutes you run the Microwave and you should be okay.

Since I don't need it, when the wife is running the hair dryer or making coffee in the morning, the A/C is not on yet and hopefully this avoids any problems.

It's just important to be aware of power management when using electricity. But you'll need to do this no matter what your power source is. You just want something (power pole or dual generators) to provide more than your power distribution panel needs so that the power panel with its breakers are the indicator of where too much power is being used. That's my preference anyway. In other words, if you have 30 of power coming in and something gets tripped, the breaker is your safeguard that this has happened and will shut things off instead of letting them run and possibly get damaged.

This has happened to us in our rig, but with our experience, DW even knows what is happening and what to do about it.

A brownout caused by a supply (pole or generator) should be avoided at all costs since this is very bad for any electrical device with a motor. But that's another subject.



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  #5  
Old 05-08-2012, 12:17 AM
Camper
Camper Type: Travel Trailer
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Northern New Mexico
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Hi all. We now have two Yamaha iS2000 inverters. For those of you who carrry this type of equipment, where do you store them while in transit? I originally wanted to mount them on the front of the RV, on shelves welded to the frame. They each weigh 48 pounds. Add to this the weight of the materials used to build the shelves and I will be adding 125+ pounds to my hitch weight. Soooooooooooo, I'm not going to do that - my hitch weight is already 16% of the MGVW. What do you think about storing them inside the RV. I was thinking about putting them in their own wooden boxes inside the trailer. To combat the gasoline ordor, I was also thinking about placing them inside plastic garbage bags before putting them in their boxes. What do you guys think?
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  #6  
Old 05-08-2012, 12:02 PM
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I have seen three options and none include storing in the RV because of potential fumes.

First, I carry my dual gennys at the front of the truck bed between the fifth wheel hitch and the cab, then I cable lock them in place along with the fuel can and extra propane bottles. I have a bed cover that I can use to cover most of this up while in transit.

Second, I have seen another where the owner built a wood grid that fits the gennys, and the fuel can in the center. This wood grid is pretty big and spans the whole rear of the truck bed so it can't be moved when it's all cable locked together. The cable locks are routed through handles and the wood framing.

The third case is keeping the generators in the front storage area, if you can make room for them. They can be difficult to remove in order to use them. And you'll need to create some ventilation of some kind. If you look at RVs with professionally installed Generators in the front storage compartments you might notice that somewhere nearby will be large vent grids to prevent any gathering of fumes while driving or even running the generators.

The difficulty comes when you want to use them. The second option, one just backs up the truck to nearest the RV power connector and plugs in, but don't forget to unplug if you go somewhere. Some have run a power cable to the front of the rig to the power distribution panel so that the connection might be made there but it's important to keep the power supply lines as short as possible or else you can lose lots of power capability from the length of the cable. You also need to know how to install isolators to protect from electrical problems if one tries to connect too many sources to the power panel (I hear this is a terrible thing to do and therefore an experienced electrician is recommended for setting this up.

The other two options require removing the gennys from the positions in order to plug into the RV. Security becomes a concern. But if you leave the RV for extended periods (like when you visit some attraction or attend some event), you unplug them and store them again, or else take your chances.

I have seen that one person bolted their gennys to a large piece of diamond plate and the diamond plate was large enough to enable the owner to park the RV in such a way to use an RV tire to sit on the diamond plate and help keep the gennys secure.

At least here's some ideas of what's been done. I'm sure there's more.

In summary, I do not suggest keeping the gennys inside the rig even if you can bag them some way to minimize fumes. Gathering and capturing fumes is a bad idea since the chance of sparks or other ignition source in an enclosed RV are so prevalent.

There is also other considerations about what to do when they're operating and I've touched on that but this should be another topic where this can be discussed.



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  #7  
Old 05-08-2012, 07:17 PM
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Thanks for the input. As we have a TT, I don't have the luxury of the space avialble around a fifth wheel. And since my hitch weight is already high, I'm going to have to figure out a way to weld a platform to the frame in the back of the RV and store them there. Should be fun.

Thanks for the input! Peter and Vicki
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  #8  
Old 05-09-2012, 12:39 AM
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Doh! I forgot that option. Others have created a platform, sometimes utilizing a rear bumper or receiver to keep the gennys strapped and locked down. However, there is a big caution on this one. The rear bumper or receiver may not be able to handle the weight of the generators by design. Typically, these supports are designed for bikes or some chairs or maybe a ladder or other very lightweight items.

When bounding down the road, I've followed some of these rigs and whatever is back there goes through some pretty good bouncing around. When hitting bumps, rough roads, dips, RxR tracks and they can really get going. Over time this can cause these items to damage something or even fall off. I also know of owners how have lost chairs and ladders or items have fallen off the rig over time as this activity occurs.

When determining what strength rating you'll need, it's estimated that three times whatever you'll be carrying. For example, if you are carrying 200lbs of gear then you'll need about 600 lbs of rating. Then whatever is back there should be strapped down very tight so the only thing moving is the trailer as it's attached to your TV. You don't want the items moving independently. It's scary following some that has bikes back there and the trailer is bouncing down the road and the bikes are bouncing with their own movement. This is not good.

Sounds like you have the right idea. I just hope you consider what's really going to be going on back there. Don't forget to account for the weight and size of an auxiliary fuel tank. I think with two genny's you'll want one of these to increase their run time.

I have friends who have these platforms, most are homemade. Would you like some pictures for ideas?

btw - I didn't recognize that you have a 28' TT. We had a previous rig that was specified as a 27', but actually measured out at 30'. 16% of the GVWR is a lot to carry on the hitch by proportion. It really should be between 10% & 12% or no more than 15%. To correct this move some heavy items to the rear of the trailer, but having the gennys and the new platform should help move some of the load to the rear of the trailer. I strongly suggest you get to the scales and weigh each axle. You should be carrying about the same load on each axle, then the remainder on the TV hitch. If you are at 16% then you might be carrying too much on the front axle.



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Last edited by artmart; 05-09-2012 at 12:49 AM..
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  #9  
Old 05-09-2012, 02:28 PM
Camper
Camper Type: Travel Trailer
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Northern New Mexico
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Art,

Good advice about the bumping around. I didn't think of that. As for the weight on the front hitch, I weighed the unit over the weekend and came up with those figures. I was really surprised to see it was so high. Maybe the scales were off or weren't designed to weigh RV's. While I would rather put the genny's on the front, the results of my "weigh-in" suggests they need to go on the back. Do you have any advise as to where I might get my unit weighed by someone who knows what they're doing? I called Camping World in Albuquerque and they don't have scales (sounds odd). Have any ideas? The place I went to was the local "eco" station that weighs the junk and debris you want to discard. It was the only place I could find a scale.

Peter
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  #10  
Old 05-10-2012, 01:07 AM
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I'm not sure what the scale availability in Northern New Mexico is but it is proper to use a certified scale like what is at some truck scales or Moving and Storage places. You should measure several axles to get all your measurements and some calculations are required to figure some of these numbers out (like pin weight or gross trailer weights).

Email me and I'll provide all the details. It will seem like a lot but after understanding how these interact it will make a lot of sense. If any Rating is exceeded then you are overweight, period. And then there also the relationships of these weights, too. I'll be glad to explain it.

As for the rear platform, if you are not an expert (I know I'm not), try a welding or tow hitch place and they can probably fabricate a very strong, sturdy and safe solution (probably a receiver) and they may have to shore up the back end. Just let them know how much weight you need to support then they can install the proper Class of receiver. Then there are aftermarket platforms to carry everything and devices that prevent any movement and security of the platform when in transit.

The only precaution is if your rig has a bumper it won't be strong enough and I hope they know what to do about it.



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2006 Ford F-250/350
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